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Hypo definitely. As for the hets, you will never know unless you breed with another corn that has either the same hets or is visual for those morphs. Pairing to a visual is better as you know 100% that the genes are there.
 

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Again thanks Ian big help as always I don't plan to breed so I guess I'll never know if she has het in her but I'm fine with that.
No idea on the blood red aspect, but the grey head probably says yes.
And if you did breed, I can guarantee there will be a whole load of hidden and unknown hets buried away.
When I got myself some new corns, years ago, I bought 2 males, 2 females.
Ghost, vanishing stripe anery, snow and hypo I think they were.
I had some VERY interesting hatchlings that were never properly identified.
 

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Breeding corns is really simple.
You will need an incubator. Previously I used a Herp Nursery 2, it lasted me several years and was perfect.
You can also make your own using a polybox, heat mat, matstat, digital thermostat, two strips of wood and an ice cream tub.
Get it all set up to run at 28C, with an incubation medium of vermiculite and water, premixed with hot water and vermiculite at a ratio of 1:1 by volume, the squeeze out excess water. The hot water is to ensure that the vermiculite is sterile.
Leave it to cool, then put the medium in the ice cream tub, which goes inside the polybox.
You put the heat mat on the bottom of the box, and two thin strips of wood across that. The ice cream tub with a few inches of medium is sat across the wood. Put the stat and thermostat probes inside the tub, put the polybox lid on, and turn it on.
This will take several days to stabilise so prepare in advance.
Just change the air weekly once up and running.
When the eggs are laid, carefully move from the laying box to the incubator without moving the position of the eggs.
About 60 days later you will be greeted by baby snakes.
At 4 months old, you have at least 2 years before even thinking about breeding.
 

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28-29 degrees C (= 82-84 degrees Fahrenheit) is a good incubation temperature. And Vermiculite and water is a good incubation medium. But my experience is that a mix of 1:1 by weight is better than a mix of 1:1 by volume. Squeezing out excess water from a 1:1 by volume mix takes hands like hydraulic presses, and my (normal?) adult human male hands are just not strong enough. A kitchen measuring cup is cheap and will measure the water acceptably. 1 ml of water weighs 1 gm. If you are in the USA, 1 fluid ounce of water weighs 1 ounce.Water will have to be added every 2 weeks or so when the eggs start to dimple (dehydrate). Good luck.
Not really.
Just squeeze out the excess.
Not difficult at all!
You squeeze, water comes out, put the squeezed vermiculite back in the incubator.
In fairness, though, the guidance from sources has always been a 1:1 ratio, some by volume, some by weight.
Having tried both I personally found by volume and squeezing out excess water worked for me.
Paulh is also an experienced breeder, just shows that what works for one may not work for another
Ultimately, you need a damp and sterile substrate.
By volume has always worked for me, with no losses.
I'm gonna guess that by weight has worked for Paulh without losses.
 
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