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I just got my bearded dragon a couple of days ago and I have a question about her lighting/heating. I have a UVA and UVB bulb and I have a Ceramic heat emitter that gives off no light. I was told to leave all 3 on during the day and then just leave the ceramic one on at night, but I've also read that if your house doesn't get too cold that you can just turn them all off at night. So I was wondering what would be the best plan of action in this situation. My house gets to about 66-69 degrees Fahrenheit at night. Thanks!
 

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I just got my bearded dragon a couple of days ago and I have a question about her lighting/heating. I have a UVA and UVB bulb and I have a Ceramic heat emitter that gives off no light. I was told to leave all 3 on during the day and then just leave the ceramic one on at night, but I've also read that if your house doesn't get too cold that you can just turn them all off at night. So I was wondering what would be the best plan of action in this situation. My house gets to about 66-69 degrees Fahrenheit at night. Thanks!
Turn the heat off overnight anyway- it gets much colder than that at night where beardies come from in the wild.
 

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Using a ceramic alongside a nice bright UVA bulb is not much different to having a halogen or similar.



True, but then that means three bulbs on the go, a ceramic, a UVA at basking and a UVB covering 2/3 of the viv.
If you are going to do that, i would say switch the ceramic for a DHP.


If you are going to go with just the two bulb setup, then you need a light emitting basking bulb (which often includes a UVA output depending on the bulb you get) and a UVB.


Ceramics are also far less directional in how they give heat, and the way the gradient will establish will be quite different, often needing greater ventilation in the cool end with vivs closer to the minimum size (if you get a bigger viv, this doesnt matter so much).
 

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This is a good point, Ceramics, producing long wavelength IR release their energy into air rather than into 'things'. This is a non-natural form of providing primary heat.

The sun provides us, through the terrestrial full-spectrum with energy via the projection of the short and medium wavelengths (IR-A, IR-B). These are the direct sources of energy and as such natural development has allowed nature to use it.

As this energy is projected down into our habitat it is available directly into 'things'. Be this animals or the terrain. It is in this way that reptiles are properly energised. The photons are simply able to get deeper into the dermis before delivering their energy.

The photons that are not used in this way reflect and bury into everything else. This energy then radiates back into the environment as long wavelength IR via convection-heated thermals. This is your typical 'Black body radiation' that we all learned at school. It is this convection of heat that releases energy into the air and the 'warmth' that we feel as it heats our planet.

These wavelengths release into air, as such they cannot create a defined basking spot. They are also not able to deliver energy directly very well at all into the animal itself.

Ceramics are good for warming air, but they are not good as primary heat sources.

You could create a basking temp of say 90 degrees with both a ceramic or a halogen or a Deep Heat Projector. All would raise the temp to the level you wish. However, the photons from the Halogen and even more so from the DHP would be more bioavailable as the energy contained within the photons in these sources are able to get deeper into the body, therefore 'more' usable energy is available to that animal.

As we all know, animals have developed over vast time in the wild, taking everything that they need to thrive from that environment. All we, as effective and ethical keepers have to do is to mimic those parameters of supply in a safe and measured way in order to allow them to thrive In captivity. If we under or over supply one or more of these parameters, or provide a parameter that is non-wildlike we cause an imbalance or ineffective supply. An imbalance in one area will cause knock on imbalances in every other aspect of the animals biological function as 'life', lived to the full is dependant upon balance-or the proper supply of the developed need.

True, but then that means three bulbs on the go, a ceramic, a UVA at basking and a UVB covering 2/3 of the viv.
If you are going to do that, i would say switch the ceramic for a DHP.


If you are going to go with just the two bulb setup, then you need a light emitting basking bulb (which often includes a UVA output depending on the bulb you get) and a UVB.


Ceramics are also far less directional in how they give heat, and the way the gradient will establish will be quite different, often needing greater ventilation in the cool end with vivs closer to the minimum size (if you get a bigger viv, this doesnt matter so much).
 
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