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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I'm new here and I hope I am posting this in the right place. A week ago we brought home our new baby leopard gecko, who we named Melon. He/she is 3-3.5 months old. The pet shop told me that he/she is eating mainly mealworms with crickets once per week.

However, since we got him/her home, Melon hasn't eaten anything. He isn't interested in the calcium-dusted mealworms, either in the bowl, from forceps, on our hands or from our fingers. He walks straight pasts crickets and locusts. Last night we tried him on Hikari Leopa Gel and he licked it a few times but would not open his mouth.

I decided to weigh him and he is 11.5g which from my research seems small for a 3 month leopard gecko. He spends all his time in the wet hide during the day, so I don't now if he has shed him skin and eaten it but I've seen no evidence of it. If we approach the vivarium when e is out, he runs into a hide, but he will tolerate handling.

The vivarium is wooden, glass door fronted, 2x3 foot. He has a ceramic heat lamp in the hot end and an Arcadia UVB tube lamp. He has three hides - hot, cool and wet. His vivarium is bioactive and has real plants (aloes and cacti). He also has a branch he occasionally climbs, and a slate under the heat lamp. He is on a 12/12 hour light/dark cycle.

Any advice would be hugely appreciated, thank you so much
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Hi, hope you’re well and congrats on the new leopard gecko!
Unfortunately I don’t own any geckos, so I can’t pass judgement on the setup.
The first thing you need to provide are full husbandry details; full enclosure size, heat lamp wattage, uvb output, hot spot temps (& how they are measured - ambient and hot etc vs thermostat & temp gun) & humidity (again, how measured) so people on the forum can give you advice, if any, on what you’re doing right/wrong.
But secondly, you need to remember that a newly purchased reptile (of any kind!) will likely (unless rehomed with setup) will be moving into a new setup (vivarium, room, sights, smells etc)… with this comes stress. Normally, you should leave a reptile at least a couple of weeks without handling and minimal interaction (apart from replacing food & water) to allow them to explore (by their own accord) their new environment to allow them to feel safe. Not eating is a common sign of stress so I would personally allow your gecko some time to settle, adjust, and see how you get on in a couple of weeks.
Of course it’s distressing when you get a new reptile and it hasn’t eaten for a week and hasn’t pooed, wee’d and is skittish. But treat this like you moving home to a new town in a new home… it would take (any normal human being) to get unpacked, settled and that’s before you start venturing outdoors!
As long as you keep the handling & contact to a minimum, offer regular food and do your research across multiple posts and sights (don’t just go for the first bit of information you see) I’m sure your gecko will settle in no time and you’ll start to see it thrive!
 

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Hi everyone,
I'm new here and I hope I am posting this in the right place. A week ago we brought home our new baby leopard gecko, who we named Melon. He/she is 3-3.5 months old. The pet shop told me that he/she is eating mainly mealworms with crickets once per week.

However, since we got him/her home, Melon hasn't eaten anything. He isn't interested in the calcium-dusted mealworms, either in the bowl, from forceps, on our hands or from our fingers. He walks straight pasts crickets and locusts. Last night we tried him on Hikari Leopa Gel and he licked it a few times but would not open his mouth.

I decided to weigh him and he is 11.5g which from my research seems small for a 3 month leopard gecko. He spends all his time in the wet hide during the day, so I don't now if he has shed him skin and eaten it but I've seen no evidence of it. If we approach the vivarium when e is out, he runs into a hide, but he will tolerate handling.

The vivarium is wooden, glass door fronted, 2x3 foot. He has a ceramic heat lamp in the hot end and an Arcadia UVB tube lamp. He has three hides - hot, cool and wet. His vivarium is bioactive and has real plants (aloes and cacti). He also has a branch he occasionally climbs, and a slate under the heat lamp. He is on a 12/12 hour light/dark cycle.

Any advice would be hugely appreciated, thank you so much View attachment 356112
View attachment 356111
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View attachment 356110
What are your temps?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi, hope you’re well and congrats on the new leopard gecko!
Unfortunately I don’t own any geckos, so I can’t pass judgement on the setup.
The first thing you need to provide are full husbandry details; full enclosure size, heat lamp wattage, uvb output, hot spot temps (& how they are measured - ambient and hot etc vs thermostat & temp gun) & humidity (again, how measured) so people on the forum can give you advice, if any, on what you’re doing right/wrong.
But secondly, you need to remember that a newly purchased reptile (of any kind!) will likely (unless rehomed with setup) will be moving into a new setup (vivarium, room, sights, smells etc)… with this comes stress. Normally, you should leave a reptile at least a couple of weeks without handling and minimal interaction (apart from replacing food & water) to allow them to explore (by their own accord) their new environment to allow them to feel safe. Not eating is a common sign of stress so I would personally allow your gecko some time to settle, adjust, and see how you get on in a couple of weeks.
Of course it’s distressing when you get a new reptile and it hasn’t eaten for a week and hasn’t pooed, wee’d and is skittish. But treat this like you moving home to a new town in a new home… it would take (any normal human being) to get unpacked, settled and that’s before you start venturing outdoors!
As long as you keep the handling & contact to a minimum, offer regular food and do your research across multiple posts and sights (don’t just go for the first bit of information you see) I’m sure your gecko will settle in no time and you’ll start to see it thrive!
Wow the shop was only feeding him once a week? He does look pretty skinny. Leos under 4 months should be fed every day
No he had mealworms every day it was the crickets he had once a week
What are your temps?
31 degrees Celsius at hot end, 28 at cool end
 

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Was your gecko housed in a vivarium or a plastic box at the pet shop. You may find that he/she is overwhelmed by the space. You could try reducing the size of the viv with a piece of wood or providing more covered areas for he/she to hide in. Hopefuly this will help. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Was your gecko housed in a vivarium or a plastic box at the pet shop. You may find that he/she is overwhelmed by the space. You could try reducing the size of the viv with a piece of wood or providing more covered areas for he/she to hide in. Hopefuly this will help. Good luck
Hi, he was in a vivarium, smaller that the one he is in now but still a fair size. Thank you for replying :)
 
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