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nobody??...alright. this ones on me fg,

Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis Macularis) Found in Melghat. Leopard Gecko, one of the largest geckos in India , recorded in Melghat Tiger Reserve by the team of Nature Conservation Society Amravati. The 200-220 mm long Gecko was found in June 2005 and the picture was sent to BNHS. Mr.Varad Giri, a well known herpetologist of BNHS has confirmed that the Gecko is “Leopard Gecko” and this is first record from the Satpuras. The team of Nature Conservation Society Amravati (NCSA), which includes wildlife activists Kishor Rithe, was camping at Tarubanda while conducting de-siltation work of Tarubanda village tank when they saw this largest Gecko. The team members Pratap Thakare, Vishal Bansod, Sanjay Rithe, Bhogelal Mavaskar, Ramu

Chimote, Suresh Dhikar and Nandaram Bhusum were surprised to see this so big gecko. First they thought that the huge animal is baby Monitor Lizard, from its size and the style of walking. But after careful observation, it was found that it is some uncommon Gecko. The pictures were sent to Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), Mumbai. Mr.Varad Giri, a well known herpetologist of BNHS recently informed NCSA that the Gecko is really uncommon for Satpuras and it’s a Leopard Gecko. However there are three species of Leopard Gecko, found in India . Eublepharis macularius in North and West India, Eublepharis fuscus in Gujrath, Rajasthan and as far south as Pune and Eublepharis hardwickii in north, central and eastern India .
This species looks like Eublepharis macularis whose distribution is recorded in north and west India . This is the first authentic record from Satpuras” Mr.Giri added. “We have good population of once extinct Forest Owlet (Athene Heteroglaux blewitti) in Melghat and now we found largest Gecko, Leopard Gecko. This is really exciting news for all of us here in Nature Conservation Society Amravati, says Kishor Rithe.The Leopard Gecko can be distinguished from all other Indian Geckos by the presence of movable eyelids. This is also called as fat-tailed Gecko. This is of robust build with distinctive swollen tail and it inhabits in arid area. Leopard Gecko is nocturnal gecko and feed largely on insects and other arthropods and sometimes preys on other Geckos too. It breeds in hot weather.


you are welcome....:2thumb:
 

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Goodness, he looks different to our tubby, complacent and very YELLOW captive-bred hybrid geckos, doesn't he?

Almost like an African fat-tail :)

Thanks for posting the description, too, Habu :)
 

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i tell you, it took a while to find even one pic. i used every key word combo i could think of. to me, it seems like only three pics exist. all sites said nothing had been studied about them in the wild. i've googled my way from india to pakistan trying to find even text on wild leos. seems like the only thing known is in captivity. someone find what i couldn't because i got whooped...never knew they were so obscure in the wild. am i just stupid or is nothing known about them outside of captivity??? never been whipped like that!!:rotfl:
 

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Maybe nobody's bothered to study them in the wild since they breed so readily in captivity.... they're easy, so you don't NEED to get the conditions spot on for how they are in the wild.
 

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Maybe nobody's bothered to study them in the wild since they breed so readily in captivity.... they're easy, so you don't NEED to get the conditions spot on for how they are in the wild.

well afghanistan and pakistan haven't been the best places to do studies for a while.
 

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i think its such a shame, i've been lookin about for something on them in the wild, and i agree, seems to be non excistant. hmmm maybe we should all get funding together and i'll go and do it :lol2: (god wouldnt that be a brill thing to do!)
 

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is there not something along the lines of most captive leos are not pure leos anyway???

sure i have heard rumbles about that somewhere along the line..

N
 

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I belive there are 5 different subspecies of leos, each with small differences.

However, in the domestic hobby, many dont relise this and inbreeding between these subspecies goes on all the time.

However, I do like that photo, lovely High melenistic leo, could do with a group of them, that all black leo still eludes even the biggest and best breeder !!
 

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i think the lizard wizard has come close tho, i've seen some almost black ones on their website
 

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Purejarrasic,

Could you elaborate on that statement please? I wasn't aware of sub-species........

What are they and whats the difference?
 

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I Cant cos I dont know enough, but our friends at VMherps do :


Leopard Gecko Trade Names

Leopard Geckos, as we know them in the pet trade, are genetic mutts! I don't mean to sound harsh here, but it helps a lot to realize this. Most of the Leopard Geckos available today can be traced back to large numbers of wild-caught specimens imported in the late 1970s. At that time, little scientific information was available about these geckos and most hobbyists had no idea there were several closely related species and subspecies among the imports. The result: many forms were bred together and today we have a genetic mess on our hands. That's the downside, the upside is that we have a lot of genetic variability present as a result!

Leopard Geckos In The wild:
The Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius) as taxonomists currently recognize it, consists of five subspecies found in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Western India (Rajasthan, Ajmer, Madar foothills), Iraq and Iran. They are:
  • Eublepharis macularius fasciolatus GÜNTHER 1864
  • Eublepharis macularius afghanicus BÖRNER 1976
  • Eublepharis macularius macularius BLYTH 1854
  • Eublepharis macularius montanus BÖRNER 1976
  • Eublepharis macularius smithi BÖRNER 1981
Additionally, four closely related species are currently recognized. At least one of these was formerly included in the E. macularius complex and has undoubtedly contributed it's unique genetic make-up to the mix currently kept in captivity as well. They are:
  • Eublepharis angramainyu
  • Eublepharis fuscus
  • Eublepharis hardwickii
  • Eublepharis turcmenicus
What does all this mean? Well, it means that today's pet Leopard Geckos are subject to an enormous amount of natural variation. In addition, several true genetic traits have been uncovered. These, combined with the natural variation, have led to the 'naming' of innumerable morphs. Many are nothing more than natural variation, and will not breed true when crossed to others with differing appearances. Others are a bit more complex and breed true, but with variation.


Above cut and paste from The Learning Center - Leopard Gecko Morphs
 

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Thanks for that.

Nice and informative. I have a "mutt" :lol2:
I prefer to think we all have Eublepharis domesticus ... a domesticated leopard gecko.
 
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