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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are looking at getting a crested gecko in the near future and are just getting things set up first. But we want it all 100% before we even consider bringing one home.

We currently have a Viv, H 76cm, W 56, D39 however it is wooden. Not ideal, but it's what we have. I've got some aquatic sealant coming so I can try and seal all the edges as much as possible.



The questions I have at this point are:

1. Is it worth lining the bottom somehow, either with glass or plastic to make it watertight.
2. Is sealing just the joints all around going to help it's durability with the humidity or will all the sides need completely coating?
3. I plan on custom making a backdrop, after a bit of research on doing so, I'd just like to know if expanding foam and pva glue are safe enough to use without any adverse chemical effects?
4. I'm undecided on whether we are going bioactive or not. The big decider is if the other half will have to deal with escaped bugs around the house. Are things like springtails likely to escape and be all over our living room? It's really appealing from an upkeep point of view, and having living plants as opposed to plastic will surely be beneficial but if we can't contain the wildlife then it'll be a no go.
5. Is it worth cutting an opening in the top of the Viv and replacing it with mesh to have a lamp outside? Or will this have too much of a negative effect on the humidity?

Any help would be very much appreciated! I've spent the past few days obsessively looking for information but I'm sure I can get a much more concise answer here!
 

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Can't Read, Can't Write But Can Drive A Tractor.
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Hiya,

I think replacing the top with mesh will be a good idea to improve air flow. You may also want to consider vents in the wood - it looks like almost a totally sealed unit! Personally I would run sealant around all the edges (which I think is what you are planning anyway?) I would also install some kind of plastic tray at the bottom to keep the substrate off the wood to reduce the risk of rot.

I would make it bio-active, I NEVER find springtails or woodlice in my flat, quite simply - the substrate is their ideal environment, my carpet isn't, if springtails do escape the viv, they will just dry out and die, but these really are tiny, almost microscopic, so nobody will see them if they do get out.

I can't help with the other questions sorry, but to be entirely honest, I would just get a more suitable enclosure from the start, you can get them quite cheaply on the classifieds on here or preloved or wherever! Perhaps consider something else for that enclosure, but off the top of my head I can't think of anything suitable, sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Amazing thank you very much.
I'll definitely go with the mesh top then if it'll help air flow. There are 2 round vents in the back high up but they're not huge so I imagine a little more will always be handy.
I'm definitely going to seal all the edges, and considering doing the Yacht varnish approach for the inside to make it last longer. I'm still on the look out for a glass exo terra going cheap though.
I think you've helped win the SO over with the bio active. Is it best to get things established well in advance before introducing a gecko to it?
 

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seal the whole thing up, you can use polyurethane sealant or yacht varnish (zero/Low VOC type), and then seal up all the edges, corners, joints, screws etc with silicone - lining the bottom and the sides (to the level of the substrate) with plastic sheets will help to

bioactive is a great way to go, you will want to seal up the bottom especially well, although with the humidity that cresties need, the whole thing will need to be carefully done if you want it to last - bioactive substrates are best if they are allowed to cycle for 4-6 weeks, to help build up bactiria and cleaner crews, get moulds under control, humidity to settle, and plants to start rooting if you add them

you wont find springtails and woodlice escaping, they need the humidity to survive


PVA is water based, it will just dissolve away almost as soon as you spray inside the enclosure - expanding foam is popular, then coated with silicone, or polystyrene coated with silicone or polyurethane sealant (can also use grout between the polystyrene and silicone, for a more detailed texture, but seal it up very well with silicone/polyurethane afterwards)
 
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