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I currently don't have a snake but am really interested in getting one! I wanted to know if either of them prefer being handled because I want to be able to handle them lots. I would also just love some general comparisons!
Thanks!
SN
 

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I'd say there are a few alternatives you could consider! African House Snakes are great beginner snakes that really rival Corn Snakes in ease of care. The females are a bit smaller than a Corn Snake and the males are a lot smaller than a Corn Snake. I have 4 of the Black African House Snake (Boaedon fuliginosus) and only one of them has ever bitten me, which left absolutely no mark. It still makes you jump a bit though! I'd also recommend Variable Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis thayeri... I think, the Kingsnake group gets re-arranged by scientists a lot) over Cali Kings. They don't get as big, don't bite as much and come in a variety of colours/patterns from Milksnake look-alikes, barred, saddled and a solid black form that's like a smaller, less bitey version of the Mexican Black Kingsnake. None of my Variable Kings have ever tried to bite me, whereas every single one of the 3 Mexican Blacks I've ever met has bitten.

The pros about choosing smaller snake species is that it's easier to provide more than the basic minimum sized enclosure for them. A 3ft snake will be able to exercise itself better than a 5ft snake could, in a 4ft vivarium. If you provide plenty of furnishings for them to investigate, they won't feel too exposed and they will make full use of the space.

More important though is which snake you prefer. There's a lot of good beginner snakes out there. Some are more expensive and harder to find than others, but are equally as bulletproof and easy going as a Corn.
 

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I currently don't have a snake but am really interested in getting one! I wanted to know if either of them prefer being handled because I want to be able to handle them lots. I would also just love some general comparisons!
Thanks!
SN
Best not to handle any snake too often, you can stress it out- it's best to only handle it occasionally. Corn snakes make a better snake for a beginner- Cali kings can be snappy & can musk on you.
 

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Best not to handle any snake too often, you can stress it out- it's best to only handle it occasionally. Corn snakes make a better snake for a beginner- Cali kings can be snappy & can musk on you.
Second this.
Both are very easy to keep, but calis are quite bitey. Simply because they see to think everything is food!
 

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Second this.
Both are very easy to keep, but calis are quite bitey. Simply because they see to think everything is food!
Plus they're defensive too- as well as biting they musk real horrible, a lovely pong of mouldy fish mixed with rancid cheese! :gasp::sick:
 

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I wanted to know if either of them prefer being handled because I want to be able to handle them lots.
SN
No snake enjoys being handled, they don't get anything from it in the same way a cat or dog enjoys the attention. They tolerate handling and human interaction, to differing degrees depending on species and individuals in that species. If you want something that you can handle "lots" then think about getting some other pet.

Handling does help with familiarisation, but all snakes will show signs of tension and stress when they feel the vibration of the enclosure being opened. Again, depending on species and individuals, some may defensively strike, or gape and hiss if they feel threatened. They do seem to learn that the threat soon goes away so that there is no need for them to quite get so wound up each time you change the water.

Of the two, I would suggest a Corn snake. On the whole they tend to settle down and become tame a lot quicker and are not as food driven as my fellow forum members have already said. If you must handle it, then stick to a short 20-30 minute handling session once or possibly twice a week. Do not handle a snake whilst it is in a shedding cycle, and leave it alone for two full days after a feed.
 

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Corn snake:
Easy to keep
Easy to feed on mice
Easy to handle
Rarely bites
Rarely if ever musks
Often feeds all year, bar males in spring/summer mating season.


Cali king snake:
Easy to keep
Easy to feed on mice
Not always easy to handle unless you know how to tame it
Often bites unless tamed
Often musks real smelly
Often stops feeding during autumn/winter
Males sometimes stop feeding in spring/summer mating season
 

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Chaz from Snakes n Adders has created an absolutely fantastic resource this year at Home.

Not only does it give lots of really good advice on setting your new snake up, if you go to the Species guides section and scroll down there is a massive list of potential beginner species and their pros and cons. Really recommend giving it a look.
 

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I agree with previous post about options. However, if you are stuck on the 2 , corns can be kept communally. I never had major issues with kings snapping and biting. I have had 4 before. Their heads are so small it's no deal . Bucking is more common, its just a viv defensive issue.anyhow. I currently have a cali king that doesn't use his viv except for using the water bowl to drink from, but heats himself on the tops of my boa vivs. He sleeps in a drawer, and every few days does a recce of the room for prey. What's not to like? A blue -eyed blonde and 6 ft. just knocks stuff off the vivs at night. my fault.
 

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I agree with previous post about options. However, if you are stuck on the 2 , corns can be kept communally. I never had major issues with kings snapping and biting. I have had 4 before. Their heads are so small it's no deal . Bucking is more common, its just a viv defensive issue.anyhow. I currently have a cali king that doesn't use his viv except for using the water bowl to drink from, but heats himself on the tops of my boa vivs. He sleeps in a drawer, and every few days does a recce of the room for prey. What's not to like? A blue -eyed blonde and 6 ft. just knocks stuff off the vivs at night. my fault.
Not true where adults are concerned, from personal experience of two of them- they hang on & it's a big enough deal to hurt & bleed like hell. Musking isn't just a viv defence reaction either, they do it outside the viv too.
 
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