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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which ones should I choose?
What's the difference?
It's for my pygmy chams, but I know you guys better and TRUST YA.
 

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Both! :D

You'll probably find that a very small species of white springtails appear in your woodlice cultures anyway ;)
If you wanted larger (european usually silver) springtails you could always pop by the woods and find some bits of bark on the surface of the substrate, ought to be one or two about!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Both! :D

You'll probably find that a very small species of white springtails appear in your woodlice cultures anyway ;)
If you wanted larger (european usually silver) springtails you could always pop by the woods and find some bits of bark on the surface of the substrate, ought to be one or two about!
That's a good idea. There's a copse about a 5 minute walk up the road from me, might give it a look.
I'll order ye olde tropical woodlice for now (I'm low on funds), as springtails seem obtainable for free! :D
 

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I use both for my pygmy chams viv - I suppose they also do have slightly different functions as a clean up crew......and they provide a bit more 'life' as my pygmys don't do much at all lol.
 

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If you mix 'live' leafmould into your substrate, you'll have both anyway, plus lots of other interesting stuff:whistling2:
 

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I always have springtails - not only coz they are the cutest insect I have ever seen (as in Life in the undergrowth series) but as a food item if I have any hatchlings that I am unaware of as my vivs are normally very heavy planted.
Baby tropical woodlice I use on the same basis as the tropical ones are nice and soft - their white bodies make it easier for any hatchlings to see...would love to get the orange tropical woodlice as well.
 

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If you mix 'live' leafmould into your substrate, you'll have both anyway, plus lots of other interesting stuff:whistling2:
like what? and where do u get this leafmould?
 

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Leaf mould like you would find under a tree or a compost heap...anywhere like that....just make sure there are no fertilizers or insecticides and that the trees are safe....safe trees like fruit trees.
These are great additions to any viv as long as the viv have temperate temps.
 

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I get mine from a mixed beech/sweet chestnut wood on the North Downs. Has all kinds of stuff in it, woodlice, springtails, millipedes spiders etc- which in a lot of cases add to the edible treats. Some of it, as pointed out, won't survive in higher temps- but enough does to contribute to self-cleaning in a viv- I use at least some mixed into the substrate in most of my vivs, even the plated lizard and corn snake have a resident population of woodlice and springtails in their vivs to help with the clean-up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Leaf mould like you would find under a tree or a compost heap...anywhere like that....just make sure there are no fertilizers or insecticides and that the trees are safe....safe trees like fruit trees.
These are great additions to any viv as long as the viv have temperate temps.
Just disintegrating leaves?
That sounds good.
I have a few fruit trees in my garden.
 

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I wish my garden had lots of juicy insects for me to harvest for free...but as I am a avid botanist and keep a huge selection of Bonsai, Orchids, Fungi and Fruit trees in my garden....its kinda got lots of chemicals in there as well........hmmmm what to do.
 

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As Ron says - just grab a load of leaves and place them into your viv as the temps for Pygmy Chams is pretty temperate.....well mine is lol.
Just make sure there are no un-desirables in there that may attack your Chams.
 

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I wish my garden had lots of juicy insects for me to harvest for free...but as I am a avid botanist and keep a huge selection of Bonsai, Orchids, Fungi and Fruit trees in my garden....its kinda got lots of chemicals in there as well........hmmmm what to do.
You can be an avid botanist and not use chems...:whistling2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As Ron says - just grab a load of leaves and place them into your viv as the temps for Pygmy Chams is pretty temperate.....well mine is lol.
Just make sure there are no un-desirables in there that may attack your Chams.
How do I make sure of that?
 

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Hmmmmmmm tried that several years ago - only problem is that most of the gardens around me have lots of diseases so the keep my plants strong and healthy didn't work as no matter how healthy my plants were........if only I could stop the wind from blowing these diseases into my garden..I would be sorted!
 

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Before you add your leaf litter - just make sure there are no large un-savoury looking insects in there......like large spiders which your Chams cannot eat.
Just by looking at what insects there is in the leaf litter - you will get an idea of what does not look safe....most are fine......but I always er on the side of caution........think its a womens thing :whistling2:
 

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There are some things- when I gardened in town, nothing would stop the onslaught of snails and slugs- but most plants fight back against most pests and diseases if they are composted well.

@Flanman: unless you have giant spiders locally that you are likely to scoop up without noticing, I wouldn't worry too much!:lol2::lol2:
 

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OK Ron.....gonna try be chemical free this year......really do want to try aphids for my frogs and catch some moths for my pygmy chams :)
 
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