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Discussion Starter #1
does anybody have any info or care sheets for these guys, mrs. rs picked one up at a little local expo last night (along with my "as yet" unnamed leucistic leopard gecko.....thank you baby!) and i haven't managed to find any captive care info on it......gorgeous looking agamid though!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
what! nobody? *sighs* poor show...guess i'll have to make it up as i go along lol
 

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found a small bit of info - copy n pasted it from internet

Sinai Agama

Latin Name: Pseudotrapelus sinaitus (Heyden, 1827).



Common name: Sinai agama. In common parlance a species of lizard.



Origin: The large agamid family is the Old World counterpart of the New World iguanids, where traditionally the “Old World” refers to our region in the Middle East and to North Africa.



Distribution in Jordan: The Sinai Agama has been observed in Al Shawbak, north of Azraq, the Dead Sea area, Ghore al Haditha, Khinzirah, Petra, Safawi, Sahl as-Siwan, and Wadi Al Mujib and Wadi Rum.

Habitat: The Sinai Agama is a diurnal ‘sit and wait’ forager that occupies a variety of open habitats. In Jordan, this species has been observed in the black lava desert, in Petra, in the Shawbak area and on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. In all these regions, the Sinai Agama was found inhabiting volcanic boulders, outcrops and hard gravel surfaces with scattered rocks.



Diet: Their diet consists mainly of ants, grasshoppers, beetles, and termites. Hunting by vision, it sits in vegetation, under a rock outcropping, or in the shade and waits until an insect or small mammal walks by and then will chase the prey. They catch their prey by using a tongue with a tip covered by mucous glands; this aids the lizard in holding onto small prey such as ants and termites.



Characteristics: The Sinai Agama is typical of the agama species in being less shy than most other reptiles, allowing relatively close approach. Body length is typically 18cm, with a long tail adding an exaggerated long appearance. Females exhibit a distinctive colouration before oviposition: the head is light blue and the back bears rusty-orange crossbars. Males are brilliant turquoise (see photo) when sexually aroused or angry, and they express territoriality by occupying a large boulder to overlook its defended area



hope that helps
 

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rstainforth said:
does anybody have any info or care sheets for these guys, mrs. rs picked one up at a little local expo last night and i haven't managed to find any captive care info on it......gorgeous looking agamid though!!!
Tut tut !!
I am gona sound horrible, but that is very irresponsible, just going and buying a reptile that you don't know anything about, you could end up killing it if you keep it at the wrong temps etc :(
Luckily you now have some info 8)
 

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i bought nearly all my stuff on impulse thats just me i suppose and my reps have been fine!

Was in that thing at the Locomotion or whatever its called?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
maybe a little irresponsible but new all what has been told to us so had a fair idea but just like to look at caresheets and make sure we know everything and havent missed anything out. As andyj says i gotta admit it was a bit of an impulse buy at the locomotive i couldnt resist and he will get as much love and care as all our reptiles do :)
 

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andyj5447 said:
i bought nearly all my stuff on impulse thats just me i suppose and my reps have been fine!

Was in that thing at the Locomotion or whatever its called?
yeah, thats the one; and as for buying on impulse, i knew enough about the region and broad knowledge of the agamids to have a stab at general care.

as for the dangers of buying on impulse, i very much believe that most of these creatures are hardy animals, and will withstand some rough treatment by way of environment...having served in both the desert and the jungle whilst i was a soldier, I know that the temperature and humidity gradients that are experienced out there can be massive. in the desert temperatures can range from 110/120 F in the daytime, to -10 at night, with snow on the ground! so a few dayts acclimatisation and getting things right isn't going to make things too hard for the little feller.

and besides, if nobody ever acted on impulse and made it up as they went along, how would we ever learn about these fascinating creatures!!

*folds arms*
 
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nice one, i take it its a male then? - females are larger and pretty boring looking. males are small and a really nice blue.

they are not difficult to look after but can get nervous and be picky eaters. biovite spray works miracles to pick up their appetite and show their colours. only problem is it makes them even more active and a bit of a bugger to catch!!

they are great wee guys.

will generally eat anything, particularly like spiders though. need a variety of insects and bugs but fatten up well on mini mealies or waxworms.

let me know how you go.
 

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I keep one myself, buy all my animals from the same store as they are good and I trust them 100%. This is what I was told when I purchased him.....

Diet-They will eat most insects (locusts, crickets, meal worms, wax worms) but if feeding them locusts they must have the smallest hoppers you can get. They will also eat a small amount of fresh veg like beardies but mine doesnt seem too keen!

Temperature-wise they want to be at between 85-95 F during the day and 75-85 F overnight. I use a heat bulb with thermostat.

Lighting- UV bulb 10-12hours a day

Substrate-a dry substrate i.e wood chip or maize. Was told maize is better for them for when they want to bury.

any questions or comments please feel free
 
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