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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We were pleased to see our first slow worm -- a female about 10 in. long -- on the move in our garden yesterday. However, after settling itself in the sun under some magnolia petals, we noted that it had stopped moving and stayed put until nightfall. We took it inside in a box with leaves and a dish of water, but it hasn't moved since. The box is now outside with a large hole cut so that it can exit, temperatures are between 11 and 15 degrees, and the worm hasn't changed at all in appearance -- It's still lustrous and is not flaccid when touched, and it's eyes are closed. Could it have slipped back into hibernation mode?
 

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Id say leave it be. Probz stress it out. Mabey leave it in the box in a nice quiet part of the garden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Her (his? no stripe down the back) box is in the flower bed -- nice and quiet -- with a weight on the lid so the stray tomcats can't get in. I'd hate to thing s/he came out on the first nice day and promptly expired.
 

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I don't see why you have put it in a box, what are you trying to fix?

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The box is for protection (toms pass through the yard all the time and there are lots of bigger birds too), and as I mentioned, it has a large exit hole -- a big easy-to-find flap cut out.
 

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Yes, I just don't see what the point was- after it leaves the box it is again at risk of predation, and there was no reason to in the first place.

To be honest birds eating it isn't really an issue, birds need to eat too...I can't justify cats though.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I asked a question about hibernation, not about care or the finer points of predation. Thanks, though, for your concern.

I'd be grateful if anyone could advise me on the current state of this slow worm.
 

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Nobody can advise with much detail if you don't give much of your own. It isn't unusual for reptiles to remain inactive for relatively large periods of time, and so I doubt there is actually anything wrong with it.

Even if it was brumating you would likely get a response from touching it.

Unless the animal is 'lifeless' it is almost certainly fine.


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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Did you even read my initial post? Maybe you want me to give you its vital stats?

Unless you've got something pertinent to contribute, please stop replying. Thanks.
 

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Sorry, the worm actually needs medical care now because it hasn't started dancing for you yet. My mistake.

I read your post, which essentially says that you moved a slow worm into a box (probably stressing it) and touched it (further stressing it).

The animal sounds healthy based on the two words describing its condition, and is displaying normal behaviour (closing eyes) based on the brief description.

You are overreacting, or under describing the issue.



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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As I thought. You just read "Blah blah blah box blah blah blah touched" and fired straight off into finger-waggling.

I hope others on the forum are more helpful (and better mannered).
 

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Sure, although I offered a summary and repeated the key points in your post. Not sure what you mean by "finger waggling", I haven't made any accusations- only stated the obvious points that can be inferred from your post.

I have been nothing other than well mannered. This discussion is clearly going nowhere though so I won't write anymore.


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The poster has only shown concern for the animal and I can understand them wanting to give protection to it from predators etc. Just because it is normal for predation doesn't mean we don't want to try and prevent one animal from becoming food. Maybe they shouldn't have picked it up but we all make mistakes when trying to help an animal we think may be stressed or hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've received some pertinent and sympathetic advice privately -- and without any holier-than-thou tut-tuts from individuals who ought to release their own reptiles -- and am continuing to monitor the animal in its safe place.
 
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