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I've been keeping fish for a number of years now and I've had a variety of different standard species. I have a spare 110 litre tank now and I'm looking to keep something different and unusual. I often have a look in aquatics shops but very rarely see anything 'mainstream' that I'd like to keep.

So I'm open for suggestions on what I could keep that would turn a few heads and I would enjoy keeping for a long time.

Thanks :)
 

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Waspfish (Vespiculadepressifrons ).

African leaf fish (Polycentropsis abbreviate) Ignore South American leaf fish as they're obligate live feeders.

Neither are suitable as beginner species!
 

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Shoal of dwarf rainbows in a heavily planted tank. There's plenty of different colours and shapes out there, some of which I've only seen a couple of times yet are beautiful.
 

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Depends on the shape of the tank, axolotl's need bottom surface area so a long low tank better than a taller tank.

I have a tank with 6 figure 8 puffers and they're lovely little things, but species only, as with most puffers.
 

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Sorry i hadnt seen the capacity of the tank.
If you want something different, puffers are pretty original fishes and i would addto the list tanganika cichlids
A 110 litre tank is too small for the vast majority of Tanganyikan cichlids, not only due to their physical size but also because of their territorial requirements.

However it would be fine for some of the small shell dwelling species which are interesting to keep. :)

I'm just pointing that out in case anyone else tries to keep tangs in a tank that is too small.
 

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How about hillstream loaches, they're a bit different, they want lots of current and well oxygenated water but there's temperate as well as tropical species.
 

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How about keeping a "mainstream" species but in a more challenging environment. I've seen some excellent set-ups with barbs in a very fast flowing rocky river set-up. Tank was about half full with lots of slate and had an external filter hidden and then a powerhead creating lots of flow over the rocks.
 

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A 110 litre tank is too small for the vast majority of Tanganyikan cichlids, not only due to their physical size but also because of their territorial requirements.

However it would be fine for some of the small shell dwelling species which are interesting to keep. :)

I'm just pointing that out in case anyone else tries to keep tangs in a tank that is too small.
Sorry in spanish and I didnt know how to say "shell dewelling" , I wanted to say that.
I think what you can do with your enclosure is to mix water with land and set up an aquaterrarium with fishes and in the land part with frogs or similar...
 

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Waspfish (Vespiculadepressifrons ).

African leaf fish (Polycentropsis abbreviate) Ignore South American leaf fish as they're obligate live feeders.

Neither are suitable as beginner species!
excellent suggestions- not easy to get though.

Shoal of dwarf rainbows in a heavily planted tank. There's plenty of different colours and shapes out there, some of which I've only seen a couple of times yet are beautiful.
yep! some of the rainbows are incredible.

How about hillstream loaches, they're a bit different, they want lots of current and well oxygenated water but there's temperate as well as tropical species.
they can be a bit delicate.
 

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dwarf rainbows are a fantastic species and show fantastic courthship and shoaling behaviour - they are very active and fast and will jump out if you dont have a lid - but a lovely species to keep
 

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Been thinking about it a bit more you could look at, bumble bee gobies, Badis badis, shrimp tank, crab tank, british native, depending on the size of tank 3ft+ a lone predator something like a rainbow snakehead or a target puffer, various catfish as a species tank glass cats, small woodcats or a big shoal of dwarf cory's.
That said from past experience pick something you like rather than has been sugested your much more likely to maintain it long term then.
 

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Been thinking about it a bit more you could look at, bumble bee gobies, Badis badis, shrimp tank, crab tank, british native, depending on the size of tank 3ft+ a lone predator something like a rainbow snakehead or a target puffer, various catfish as a species tank glass cats, small woodcats or a big shoal of dwarf cory's.
That said from past experience pick something you like rather than has been sugested your much more likely to maintain it long term then.
Kif

Out of all British freshwater species there's really only sticklebacks and minnows which are suitable in such a small tank.

A 110 litre tank is also on the small side for a rainbow snakehead don't you think? They can grow to around 17cm in length. Same again with the target puffer fish which grows almost the same length.
 

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A 110 litre tank is too small for the vast majority of Tanganyikan cichlids, not only due to their physical size but also because of their territorial requirements.

However it would be fine for some of the small shell dwelling species which are interesting to keep. :)

I'm just pointing that out in case anyone else tries to keep tangs in a tank that is too small.
I second this, how about a nice colony of n.multifasciatus?
Not something that's seen TOO often but still very easy upkeep and an interesting species.
 
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