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Discussion Starter #1
Evening all, I can't believe I don't know this already but I just wanted to make sure!!

To worm Whistle I'm after 2.5% Panacur....right?

When I search for it online it comes up with loads of different packaging supposedly for different animals like sheep etc.....do I need to buy a specific product/manufacturer?

Thank you!! Whistle doesn't seem right - off her food a bit, not pooed in a while and sleeps a lot more than usual without coming out to bask. :?::(
 

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all Panacure is fenbendozoll based this is the suspension percentage of the product. I hope this helps

Edit Panacure is a brand......
 

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if u really cant find it go to ur closest vet they should have it in stock.
gdluck hope whistle gets better soon
 

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From the site

The drug of choice for treating nematode infections is fenbendazole at 10-25 mg/kg, PO, for 3-5 days. Administration is stopped for 10 days, and then the 3- to 5-day regimen is repeated. Administering fenbendazole on consecutive days is more effective than giving doses once every 7-10 days. If protozoans are to be treated concurrently, dosage may be increased to 50 mg/kg fenbendazole with the aforementioned regimen. When parasites are resistant to fenbendazole or have not been eliminated after 2 oral courses, the reptile can be treated with ivermectin at 0.2 mg/kg, PO, once every 7-10 days for 3 treatments. Fenbendazole has a much broader margin of safety than ivermectin and should be used first. Complications, from mild ataxia to paralysis and death, have been associated with the use of ivermectin, although it has been used safely in snakes and lizards at 0.2-0.4 mg/kg. In turtles, ivermectin toxicity (paresis) has been seen at dosages as low as 0.025 mg/kg; therefore, ivermectin is not recommended for use in turtles. Levamisole at 10-50 mg/kg via intracoelomic, IM, or SC injection, and at 200 mg/kg, PO, has been reported to be effective for Rhabdias spp . The margin of safety for levamisole is very narrow, and it should be used with caution.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your speedy replies!

That info Horsfield looks really interesting, what I'll do is go away and read it all plus the links before asking any more questions. :2thumb:

Also glad to see I'm not the only one sat online on a Saturday night! :lol2: We are cool really, right?!
 

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Thank you all for your speedy replies!

That info Horsfield looks really interesting, what I'll do is go away and read it all plus the links before asking any more questions. :2thumb:

Also glad to see I'm not the only one sat online on a Saturday night! :lol2: We are cool really, right?!
Lol I agree
 

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Evening all, I can't believe I don't know this already but I just wanted to make sure!!

To worm Whistle I'm after 2.5% Panacur....right?

When I search for it online it comes up with loads of different packaging supposedly for different animals like sheep etc.....do I need to buy a specific product/manufacturer?

Thank you!! Whistle doesn't seem right - off her food a bit, not pooed in a while and sleeps a lot more than usual without coming out to bask. :?::(
It's not a stupid question it is very important and not to be taken lightly.While horsfield is correct in that 'panacur' is a brand name for 'fenbedazole', it would be incorrect to assume that the percentage on the pack is an easy guide. What you have to watch is whether you are using paste or liquid. I use the paste as it is so much easier to handle unless you are tubing, which I would not recommend unless you have done it previously under instruction.The puppy and kitten paste is 18.75% but has to be given as a dosage of 100mg per kg bodyweight. I'm sure you can see how this could be disastrous.Fenbendazole does have a high safety margin but possibly not this high ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Naively I thought this would be all so much simpler! That does make a lot of sense though, thanks.
 

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Also glad to see I'm not the only one sat online on a Saturday night! :lol2: We are cool really, right?!
Hey fab I've never been cool before!!!

Having read all of that on the worming Im gonna stick to the original idea of going to the vet I think!!! I'm far too confused by it all at the moment to do it safely at home - I had thought about last week funnily enough as the chap at the local equine shop was talking to me about Panacur.
 

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What you have to watch is whether you are using paste or liquid. I use the paste as it is so much easier to handle unless you are tubing, which I would not recommend unless you have done it previously under instruction.The puppy and kitten paste is 18.75% but has to be given as a dosage of 100mg per kg bodyweight. I'm sure you can see how this could be disastrous.Fenbendazole does have a high safety margin but possibly not this high ;)
What are you wittering on about? I dont understand this at all. Regardless of the 10%/18.75% etc or the formulation of tubing/paste, you quite simply use the correct dosage in terms of mg/kg for the animal. I am not sure where the confusion is?
 

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maybe the paste is different to the liquid and doesnt have a measurement dial?? im not sure. I thought the liquid form was easy to use with a dial on it to give you the correct dosage as per the weight of the tortoise?

Its not hard to use surely.

I squirt some on their food when they take their next mouthful - job done, no hissing about tube feeding, opening mouths etc etc, unless of course one wasnt eating, which then you would need to intervene and use the appropriate steps - which would be opening their mouths or vets.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What are you wittering on about? I dont understand this at all. Regardless of the 10%/18.75% etc or the formulation of tubing/paste, you quite simply use the correct dosage in terms of mg/kg for the animal. I am not sure where the confusion is?
I'm getting more and more confused, is the 10%/18.75% not the concentration of the active ingedients? Or again I could be simplifying it too much. Whistle weighs 140g so no matter the percentages you give the same dose of either?!

Sorry if I don't get it! :blush:
 

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maybe the paste is different to the liquid and doesnt have a measurement dial?? im not sure. I thought the liquid form was easy to use with a dial on it to give you the correct dosage as per the weight of the tortoise?

Its not hard to use surely.

I squirt some on their food when they take their next mouthful - job done, no hissing about tube feeding, opening mouths etc etc, unless of course one wasnt eating, which then you would need to intervene and use the appropriate steps - which would be opening their mouths or vets.
The problems I have found with liquid is that it runs off so dosage is not accurate, paste stays put. The dosage is easy to read but what I was saying was that if you had been given instructions for a certain percentage of liquid and then used that against the paste the ratio would be well out. Just igonre me I was only trying to help. At least some understood!
 

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I'm getting more and more confused, is the 10%/18.75% not the concentration of the active ingedients? Or again I could be simplifying it too much. Whistle weighs 140g so no matter the percentages you give the same dose of either?!

Sorry if I don't get it! :blush:
Jeez it's hard work like being on teaching practice. Think I'll take a break from here for a while. Even the mods could not hack it lol
 

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Evening all, I can't believe I don't know this already but I just wanted to make sure!!

To worm Whistle I'm after 2.5% Panacur....right?

When I search for it online it comes up with loads of different packaging supposedly for different animals like sheep etc.....do I need to buy a specific product/manufacturer?

Thank you!! Whistle doesn't seem right - off her food a bit, not pooed in a while and sleeps a lot more than usual without coming out to bask. :?::(

Since there are other 'issues', then the vet would be the best place to go. Not only will you know he's been wormed safely, but the vet can check for anything else which may be causing the issues.
Off her food, not pooing and sleeping more than usual would not immediately make me think of worms. In fact those symptoms alone would have me at my vets pretty fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Jeez it's hard work like being on teaching practice. Think I'll take a break from here for a while. Even the mods could not hack it lol
Awwwwwww
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Since there are other 'issues', then the vet would be the best place to go. Not only will you know he's been wormed safely, but the vet can check for anything else which may be causing the issues.
Off her food, not pooing and sleeping more than usual would not immediately make me think of worms. In fact those symptoms alone would have me at my vets pretty fast.
She ate pretty well today, I'll take her along for a fecal etc but I'm not very happy with my vets - I keep asking for any decent exotics vet in the central belt of Scotland but noone can think of any. :(
 

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She ate pretty well today, I'll take her along for a fecal etc but I'm not very happy with my vets - I keep asking for any decent exotics vet in the central belt of Scotland but noone can think of any. :(
Its most likely because you don't really associate middle Scotland with exotic animals.

Except Nessie. ;)
 
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