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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have for sale a 2011, male Suriname Boa constrictor constrictor. He is eating well on defrost rat pups, poos/sheds fine. Easy to handle.

Collection from Chester, or we are happy to use a reptile specialist courier (buyers expense).

PM us for more photographs or any questions.





Swaps considered for royal pythons, carpet pythons, geckos (Rhacs, Phelsuma, or Lygodactylus) of a similar price or as part exchange. We may consider swaps for other snakes (not corns) just ask! :2thumb:

Thank you,

Laura
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Heya,

It is evident that there are a few people who wish to dispute which species this snake is. This snake was bred by a well known breeder in the US and came to us in a shipment, we decided he wasn't for us and so have put him up for sale.. We do not have paperwork to prove locale. We have contacted the breeder again to clarify whether this animal is a BCC or a BCI and have been assured that this animal was produced from a Suriname x Suriname pairing, and that the origins of both parents is known.

We have no intention of selling anything to anyone under false pretenses. The snake has been double checked due to the first query two days ago, and my other half took the photograph in natural light with no effects or photo-shopping after to make the animal look any different, so that any interested buyer knows the exact colouration of this specimen. I'm not sure exactly what else we can do, however I'm not prepared to sell this animal as a BCI when the breeder knows it to be a BCC.

Some of the best breeders and boa experts (for example, Vince Russo, if one wishes for a reference) categorically state that some boas cannot be determined as a BCI or BCC simply by looking at the specimen, and that scale counts are the only definitive way to do so. Having said this, it is impossible to refute that some specimens can be looked at - the peaked saddles or uniform ovals between them, the face, the tail etc - and it can be concluded that yes, it is a BCC. Other specimens can be looked at - the irregular saddle distance for example - and it can be concluded that no, that's a BCI. However this is not always the case, and many specimens are not at the distinct end of the spectrum. The two species are so closely related that they can be crossed, it is only to be expected that the best looking BCIs look remarkably like the browner BCCs, simply because of their relatedness. It would be illogical to expect the two species to never resemble eachother - if the photo is not enough to convince a few people of it's species, then we do apologies, we did our best to ensure it is an accurate portrait of the specimen.

In future we would prefer people to pm us with queries like this as I'm sure it will put other potential buyers off if they thought it did look like a BCC however were made unsure because of a few peoples opinions on the visual categorisation of species from photos. This animal is honestly stunning in the flesh, and personally I think you can look at it and say "yes, that is a BCC", obviously the photo hasn't done it justice. It is impossible for some people - no matter how long you've been keeping a species, or how many you've kept - to identify a species from a photo. Try telling me if a species is a Trinidad piping guan or a blue throated piping guan from a photo, it's simply impossible. We have done our best to make 100% certain that this specimen is a BCC. Pm me with any questions, but please don't muddy the water on this, it is not a thread, it is a for sale advert.

I apologies in advance for any sentence or paragraph that seems abrupt or rude, it was not intentional and is solely to clarify that we are not ripping anyone off, are selling with honest intentions, are open to criticism but will not be ripped off ourselves by selling this BCC as a BCI. We also wouldn't want someone expecting the physic of a BCI, or the hardiness of a BCI to end up with a BCC that they are not experienced enough to care fore properly.

Sorry for the lengthy reply, we often see "red tails" for sail that we suspect are BCI's, and often the seller admits they have no knowledge of it's origin, however this is not one of those cases.

Again, please pm me replies rather than post them on this sale advert,

Thanks,

Laura
 
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