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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So just after A Little Advice As Snakes are Usually My Thing.

I know that most non-hibernating species grow to be quite large, larger than most hibernating species anyways. I know there is a big debate whether over wintering a hibernating species does it long term damage etc , with people saying it is OK and others disagreeing and saying you SHOULD hibernate your tortoise if it is healthy enough to do so.

my question is what are your views on if i were to get a tortoise and not hibernate it or should i buy a non hibernating species.

i know there are some smaller non hibernating like the indian star etc
but i dont want to buy a tortoise and not see it for so many months of the year lol so i guess my question is, are there many small non hibernating species and/or what do people do on here with there hibernating sp

all input towards owning a tortoise will be greatly appreciated but that ^^^ is my main concern :)

Thankyou in advance

Aaron
 

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Well there is not a big debate on her about your question. Us old timers tend to hibernate our healthy tortoises. I like to keep my animals as near as possible to what they would have in the wild. I know what works for all my animals and animal care and husbandry experience only comes with time. For a first time tortoise owner, do as much reading as you can. Many tortoises are now kept more like domestic pets, inside in tortoise tables, same as snakes and lizards. It doesn't mean this is the best we can do for them. I like my lizards and tortoises to enjoy life outside under the sun. If you let them spend time outside in the summer, their own clock tells then when it is time to wind down. Alot of new owners do not realise this when they go for a Mediterranean tortoise. You cannot dictate to the tortoise how it shoud behave. So, we let them do what comes naturally, hibernation. Tortoises require more care than snakes and lizards and you will find if you have a Med. tortoise as well as your other beasts, hibernation time will give you more time for your other reptiles.

Now if you want to go for a different type of tortoise, think carefully and get as much advice as possible. Many can go out in the summer but need heat and humidty during the winter.

What you decide to do is eventually your own decision and must fit in with your circumstances. As far as not hibernating a tortoise, there has not been enough research done on what the long term effects are likely to be. This is understandable as they are so long lived. As with all reptiles, even lizards is captivity, many like a period of brumation. It is also necessary for breeding. I think you have to be very careful in trying to alter the living and sleeping patterns with reptiles that they have been used to for thousands of years as it can lead to long term health problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well there is not a big debate on her about your question. Us old timers tend to hibernate our healthy tortoises. I like to keep my animals as near as possible to what they would have in the wild. I know what works for all my animals and animal care and husbandry experience only comes with time. For a first time tortoise owner, do as much reading as you can. Many tortoises are now kept more like domestic pets, inside in tortoise tables, same as snakes and lizards. It doesn't mean this is the best we can do for them. I like my lizards and tortoises to enjoy life outside under the sun. If you let them spend time outside in the summer, their own clock tells then when it is time to wind down. Alot of new owners do not realise this when they go for a Mediterranean tortoise. You cannot dictate to the tortoise how it shoud behave. So, we let them do what comes naturally, hibernation. Tortoises require more care than snakes and lizards and you will find if you have a Med. tortoise as well as your other beasts, hibernation time will give you more time for your other reptiles.

captivity, many like a period of brumation. It is also necessary for breeding. I think you have to be very careful in trying to alter the living and sleeping patterns with reptiles that they have been used to for thousands of years as it can lead to long term health problems.

i suppose this is true about altering their natural behaviours etc
as for brumation i do cool my reps a little in the winter and start to re introduce warmer temps coming into spring time but i do not breed :).

i've always read about tortoises etc because theyve always fascinated me but ive never even attempted to own one. i would most likely get a tropical species of tort. i would LOVE a red foot or a cherry head but their adult size enclosure and trying to heat/keep the humidty in that is what deters me from owning one.

i guess im still a long shot off knowing if and what tortoise is for me, thankyou for the reply though

Aaron
 

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Hingebacks are a great species and don't grow too big. I have six, fantastic torts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
funny enough i was looking at bells hingebacks but they dont popup for sale too often

:) x
 

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Yeah true. You might be lucky though and stumble across one or two. Not the cheapest tort either from what I recall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
my local shop used to have about 12 but they was all WC n pretty much full grown. id like to know at least some history if i were to get one.
thankyou for the reply though.
Aaron
 

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my local shop used to have about 12 but they was all WC n pretty much full grown. id like to know at least some history if i were to get one.
thankyou for the reply though.
Aaron
Yeah your right, always good to know where your pets come from. I always hate to hear of wild caught torts for sale. Good luck on your search what ever you decide to get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
theres WC available on exotic-pets.co.uk
but theyre quite grown .

thankyou
Aaron
 
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