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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

You're going away for a long weekend, do you -

1) Leave your snake at home and ask a family with no experience to look after it?

2) Transport your snake (1.5 hour trip) to your friend's house who also has a snake?

Cheers,
Al
 

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Is this your first reptile/animal/pet? If not, what have you done previously?

We don't keep snakes, but I would have thought a trusted friend/neighbour even with no knowledge, would be better than a car journey. You seem to have grasped how to care for your snake pretty quickly, so I'm sure they could too!

What are your thoughts on a longer holiday next year, for example?
 

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How olds your Snake? I’ve left my adult corn for 4 weeks before without issue. Just pre fed an extra mouse at the last feeding and knocked the temperature down a couple of degrees. She slept it off and the only difference was how hard she hit her mouse when I got home. It might have been recently defrosted but she made sure it didn’t get away.
Regardless of age a long weekend alone will be fine for any Snake. Travel is a big stressor for any animal. Not worth it in my opinion.


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I ask my mother to look after my animals - she has absolutely no experience of keeping reptiles.

The reason I ask her is that she does EXACTLY as I ask her - not what she thinks (because she doesn't know any better) she should do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the answers guys.

Transporting Gerty from the reptile center to my house did seem to stress her as she defecated in the box and that was only a short journey.

I'm keeping a record of feedings and then defecation so I can work out when this is likely to happen post-feed and try to minimize the risk of her water supply being fouled.

The freshness of her water is the concern for me.
 

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Even without fresh water your Snake will be okay for a few days. These animals are incredibly tough and store what they need.
Yes if you were to leave for a couple of weeks have someone change it. But for short stints your Snake will be perfectly okay without water.


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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi Stephen,

She's in the box you see in my signature for now (disregard the position of the snake furniture, I had to move it carefully to get her out!).

I moved her into that based on her current size and also the fact I wanted to provide a hide at the warm and cool end to allow her to thermoregulate freely without sacrificing security.

(She hatched on 19/6 and is roughly 40cm long.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes it does look a bit small looking at the photo again! It could be the perspective. I misread your earlier question - I think it's about 28 x 12 cm.
There are 2 normal sized toilet rolls, a small water bowel, some plastic foliage with enough floor space to move/burrow around these objects freely. From what I gathered so far it's not advisable to move a snake into too large of an environment early on as it may cause them some stress.
 

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We don't keep snakes, but from what I've read on here the length for a youngster's housing should be as long/longer than the snake and the width and height half of the snake's length, so 40cm x 20cm x 20cm minimum?
 

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From what I gathered so far it's not advisable to move a snake into too large of an environment early on as it may cause them some stress.
I have heard this piece of information so many times before, I am curious where it originates from? Cause if these snakes got stressed so easily in an large environment, how do they survive in the wild? I have never seen/had issues with small snakes in large enclosures as long as you provide enough cover for that species. As a purely biological stand point, when snakes are young they are at their most risk of being predated in the wild, so therefore they will want to limit their exposure to predators. An example I have seen are baby snakes living within a large gorse, and the fact they would use all the gorse and not just a small area should suggest that when given the opportunity use as much space as needed, as long as it still gives them protection?

Cheers,
TM
 
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From what I gathered so far it's not advisable to move a snake into too large of an environment early on as it may cause them some stress.
The perfect example of an urban myth.
So as not to antagonise Malc (that's a joke mate :Na_Na_Na_Na:) it has been done to death to be fair. Use the search function and you will be able to read the same arguments all night. :2thumb:
 

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The perfect example of an urban myth.
So as not to antagonise Malc (that's a joke mate :Na_Na_Na_Na:) it has been done to death to be fair. Use the search function and you will be able to read the same arguments all night. :2thumb:
:2thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well to be fair my incorrect assumption was in reply to Stephen P as opposed to a direct question about tub size for neonates :)

Having read loxocemus' 'A Beginners Guide to Cornsnakes (Pantherophis guttatus)' (yes I actually did read a selection of stickies and guidelines prior to diving in on this forum :halo:), he does mention different sizes of housing being appropriate for juveniles and adults. There does appear to be some differences of opinion on this.

In the thread I started called 'Hindsight is 20/20?', I was some some good advice:

"Don't panic !, Keep calm, and ask questions"
(Malc)

"Don't take too much notice if you get a roasting on here for asking noobie questions. No one is perfect and normally helpful, experienced keepers sometimes get out of bed on the wrong side."
(Paul F)

:snake:
 

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I probably agree with more that is written on various topics by both Malc and Ed, than anyone else on this forum, but I can also have my most passionate disagreements with the pair of them as well.
There are too many grey areas in this hobby where personal opinion isn't necessarily fact. What I believe on a certain subject may work 100%, and yet be almost polar opposite of their views, and all our snakes be perfectly healthy.
I have a lot of respect for Stu as a keeper, (and appreciate his quirky sense of humour :2thumb:) but we are not even close when it comes to our views on housing requirements for certain species! His animals are perfectly healthy too.

All my juvenile animals have gone into their adult sized enclosures. None have stopped eating, shedding, crapping or died of stress. But that is just what works for me.
If I told you why I think it is so, it could/would sound like I am slating the people who do things differently, when that isn't the case at all. :blush:
You have to take in all the info you can, and just make your own decisions from there.
 
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