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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have done a search on here but can't find anything that quite answers my question, so I hope somebody will be able to give a bit of advice.

I'm really keen to adopt a retired greyhound, but I want to first of all find out what the risk is keeping it in the house with a musk turtle.

My musk is in an elevated laguna tub in the corner of the sitting room, and probably wouldn't be visible from dog height even when he's basking, although he does love to try and climb out via his platform (which is next to the wall - doesn't seem to have clocked this bless him) so he may be noticeable then. He also loooooves to make his presence known by splashing around as much as possible, so again this might attract attention.

On the other hand, one of the reasons behind my specific choice of a retired greyhound is that they are supposed to be very gentle and pretty lazy, so I was hoping that they'd be a better bet than say any sort of terrier or collie, for example.

However obviously I would want to do as much as possible to protect the turtle, so I was thinking of putting up some sort of screen around his tub - does anybody have any recommendations? Ideally I'd like something that I could sort of fold back to feed him and just hang out with him for a bit, because he really responds to people coming close to the tub and talking to him, so I wouldn't want to deprive him of that!
I was also thinking that probably the best thing to do while I am out of the house would be to keep the living room door closed so that the dog can't get in unsupervised, but do you think that supervised access would be ok? I don't think I would want a dog if I couldn't cuddle up with it on the sofa!

Any advice would be much appreciated, thanks in advance :2thumb:
 

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greyhounds are trained to chase a moving lure. Anything remotely catching its eye that moves will provoke this response. (Much the same as ratting terriers).
Trust will not be an issue. However many times the dog will happily co exist with a turtle or tortoise, one day, the chances are high that the chase response will be triggered, to the detriment of the turtle/ tortoise.

Therefore, what you say about 'out of sight, out of mind' is the correct way forward, along with 'can see but can't get at'.
 

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Hi all,

I have done a search on here but can't find anything that quite answers my question, so I hope somebody will be able to give a bit of advice.

I'm really keen to adopt a retired greyhound, but I want to first of all find out what the risk is keeping it in the house with a musk turtle.

My musk is in an elevated laguna tub in the corner of the sitting room, and probably wouldn't be visible from dog height even when he's basking, although he does love to try and climb out via his platform (which is next to the wall - doesn't seem to have clocked this bless him) so he may be noticeable then. He also loooooves to make his presence known by splashing around as much as possible, so again this might attract attention.

On the other hand, one of the reasons behind my specific choice of a retired greyhound is that they are supposed to be very gentle and pretty lazy, so I was hoping that they'd be a better bet than say any sort of terrier or collie, for example.

However obviously I would want to do as much as possible to protect the turtle, so I was thinking of putting up some sort of screen around his tub - does anybody have any recommendations? Ideally I'd like something that I could sort of fold back to feed him and just hang out with him for a bit, because he really responds to people coming close to the tub and talking to him, so I wouldn't want to deprive him of that!
I was also thinking that probably the best thing to do while I am out of the house would be to keep the living room door closed so that the dog can't get in unsupervised, but do you think that supervised access would be ok? I don't think I would want a dog if I couldn't cuddle up with it on the sofa!

Any advice would be much appreciated, thanks in advance :2thumb:
If it's a retired racer it will be worth bearing in mind it's drive will possibly be that much higher than one that hasn't raced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
greyhounds are trained to chase a moving lure. Anything remotely catching its eye that moves will provoke this response. (Much the same as ratting terriers).
Trust will not be an issue. However many times the dog will happily co exist with a turtle or tortoise, one day, the chances are high that the chase response will be triggered, to the detriment of the turtle/ tortoise.

Therefore, what you say about 'out of sight, out of mind' is the correct way forward, along with 'can see but can't get at'.
Of course I managed to find this out about the chasing instinct having already posted here, doh!

Thanks very much for the heads up : victory:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
image

Ive got that split bamboo garden fence stuff round mine, dont know if it be any use with yours.

testing my patience with tapatalk again!
Thanks! That's exactly what I was thinking as I've seen it in set up photos before. Did you just get it from a regular garden centre, and was it reasonably priced?

Also I bloody love your set up, I saw a picture the other day and it makes my heart hurt with envy.
 

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Ye its from b&q, about £6 I think for a few metres, its all 1 piece round mine. Drill pairs of little holes in the lip/overhang round the outside and use cableties to attach it.

testing my patience with tapatalk again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ye its from b&q, about £6 I think for a few metres, its all 1 piece round mine. Drill pairs of little holes in the lip/overhang round the outside and use cableties to attach it.

testing my patience with tapatalk again!
Perfect, thanks very much :no1:
 

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If it's a retired racer it will be worth bearing in mind it's drive will possibly be that much higher than one that hasn't raced.
Having worked with ex racing greyhounds for many years, I can confidently say that most are retired because they don't have the prey drive. I've never had one chase a tortoise as they just don't move fast enough. They are sight hounds and don't take a lot of notice of things under their noses, more likely things moving fast in the distance. The same applies as with any dog though, never give them the opportunity and it won't happen. Generally greyhounds don't like water and are not chewers. The worst offenders are retrievers or terriers, both of which like to chew and carry things.My own greyhounds have always been quite happy to ignore anything walking about the garden, but it only happens when I am there. I only know of one rogue, which was not to be trusted and was suspected to have neurological problems. Hope this helps ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Having worked with ex racing greyhounds for many years, I can confidently say that most are retired because they don't have the prey drive. I've never had one chase a tortoise as they just don't move fast enough. They are sight hounds and don't take a lot of notice of things under their noses, more likely things moving fast in the distance. The same applies as with any dog though, never give them the opportunity and it won't happen. Generally greyhounds don't like water and are not chewers. The worst offenders are retrievers or terriers, both of which like to chew and carry things.My own greyhounds have always been quite happy to ignore anything walking about the garden, but it only happens when I am there. I only know of one rogue, which was not to be trusted and was suspected to have neurological problems. Hope this helps ;)
That helps a lot, thanks very much. :2thumb:
 

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Having worked with ex racing greyhounds for many years, I can confidently say that most are retired because they don't have the prey drive. I've never had one chase a tortoise as they just don't move fast enough. They are sight hounds and don't take a lot of notice of things under their noses, more likely things moving fast in the distance. The same applies as with any dog though, never give them the opportunity and it won't happen. Generally greyhounds don't like water and are not chewers. The worst offenders are retrievers or terriers, both of which like to chew and carry things.My own greyhounds have always been quite happy to ignore anything walking about the garden, but it only happens when I am there. I only know of one rogue, which was not to be trusted and was suspected to have neurological problems. Hope this helps ;)
We tried rehoming one years ago and it's drive was far higher than any other sight hound I've ever owned.
 

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Of course I managed to find this out about the chasing instinct having already posted here, doh!

Thanks very much for the heads up : victory:
Then don't ask the obvious then.
I have done health checks 4 times a year for 25 years with the nations tortoises, and if I had £10 for every dog mauled tortoise that I had seen, I would have a new car on the drive.

I was trying to help, but for some people, actual experience is the only lesson.
 

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We tried rehoming one years ago and it's drive was far higher than any other sight hound I've ever owned.
Yes, it will be for small things in the distance, but this very rarely relates to slow moving close up creatures. Obviously there is always an exception as I mentioned. I never let my daughters terriers or my friends retriever visit though as that would be far more dangerous. Again, it's down to training and supervision. I've never had an incident myself, unlike one of the people on this group who had one of my babies and subsequently allowed a small fluffy dog jump up and take a bite of it ***128558;
 

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boxman;12295055 I was trying to help said:
Lots of that here and no mauled tortoises. I do vet new owners very carefully and explain the dangers and in two cases where the owners had one of those dogs that 'wouldn't do that' did actually take the babies back home with me. It's common sense and I would never give up either my torts or my dogs. Wish I had applied the same rule to the person with the sweet cavalier ***128521;
 

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Yes, it will be for small things in the distance, but this very rarely relates to slow moving close up creatures. Obviously there is always an exception as I mentioned. I never let my daughters terriers or my friends retriever visit though as that would be far more dangerous. Again, it's down to training and supervision. I've never had an incident myself, unlike one of the people on this group who had one of my babies and subsequently allowed a small fluffy dog jump up and take a bite of it ***128558;
Musk turtles can be quite nippy when startled.
 

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Musk turtles can be quite nippy when startled.
Second worst bite I ever had from a turtle was from a 3" musk turtle. Man they have sharp powerful jaws!
 
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As mentioned, never leave any dog to its own devices. Training is needed with any breed. You'd never believe the amount of untrained dogs out there, it's unbelievable.
Training manuals don't come with children, and I am afraid that dogs are often considered to be 'children', hence the problems.
 

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Training manuals don't come with children, and I am afraid that dogs are often considered to be 'children', hence the problems.
You treat a dog like a child, you will have problems, which is why responsible rescues will vet the homes, match dogs to owners/other pets and put a training plan into place. Its most often, but not always people who buy silly designer pups and their associated problems, fail to train them and wonder where it all went wrong, who have 'accidents'.
 

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You treat a dog like a child, you will have problems, which is why responsible rescues will vet the homes, match dogs to owners/other pets and put a training plan into place. Its most often, but not always people who buy silly designer pups and their associated problems, fail to train them and wonder where it all went wrong, who have 'accidents'.
If kids where treated like dogs you wouldn't have the little shites running around with zero respect for their peers causing chaos.
 
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