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basically some amphibians skin is quite thin and while it allows the absorption water and a few other benefits higher levels of UVB lighting can be harmful, this is especially prevalent in certain nocturnal and certain terrestrial species, horned frogs hide on the bottom of rain forest floors digging into the earth this means they have very little exposure to UVB rays since they are convered by the canopy and has evoloved with little protection to UVB, there eye's are easily damaged as well. while 1 or 2 % probably wont do any harm its very unlikey (and there is no scientific proof that i know off) that UVB rays do them any good and anything over 4 or 5% can be quite harmful over mid to longer periods of exposure, so why bother having something that doesnt do them any harm and can possibly cause some harm

also albino's (as with all albinos) have a lower amount of the pigment that blacks UVB rays thus making the chances of damage more likely

to sum up they are in general a species that hasnt evolved to high level UVB exposure and being an albino just makes it worse
 

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3,223 Posts
basically some amphibians skin is quite thin and while it allows the absorption water and a few other benefits higher levels of UVB lighting can be harmful, this is especially prevalent in certain nocturnal and certain terrestrial species, horned frogs hide on the bottom of rain forest floors digging into the earth this means they have very little exposure to UVB rays since they are convered by the canopy and has evoloved with little protection to UVB, there eye's are easily damaged as well. while 1 or 2 % probably wont do any harm its very unlikey (and there is no scientific proof that i know off) that UVB rays do them any good and anything over 4 or 5% can be quite harmful over mid to longer periods of exposure, so why bother having something that doesnt do them any harm and can possibly cause some harm

also albino's (as with all albinos) have a lower amount of the pigment that blacks UVB rays thus making the chances of damage more likely

to sum up they are in general a species that hasnt evolved to high level UVB exposure and being an albino just makes it worse

man i just re read that, you can tell how knackered i was last night when i wrote it :blush:

I'm going to have to get back to you on this one when I have more time!

Which species of Ceratophrys are we discussing?
probably ceratophrys cranwelli and/or ceratophrys ornata, i think most the stuff ive read about UVB damage to horned frogs relates mainly to C Ornata and albinos (which always are more easily damaged by UVB rays in any species)
 
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