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How old do green anoles need to be before you can sell them?

I've had a few hatch recently and people interested in buying them. I obviously dont want to let them go too young but would like to let people know a time frame for when they will be ready.

Also looking at possible down sizing my collection a little so I'd like to know a time frame for myself too (if that makes sense)

Thanks
 

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could only find this im afraid, id assume once they've had say 4-6 consecutive feeds with you guys then they'd be ok to go??
sorry cant help anymore!









The hatchlings must fend for themselves, as anoles are by nature solitary animals since birth and are not cared for by the mother or the father. The young hatchlings must be wary of other adult anoles in the area as well as larger reptiles and mammals, who could just see the newly hatched anole as another mid-day snack. Yet if the young anole survives and manages to escape the many predators that haunt its world, it too will one day become a full-fledged adult.
For breeding anoles in captivity, however, for best results the eggs must be taken out of the adults' enclosure and incubated in moist, not wet, vermiculite at a temperature of around 85 degrees Fahrenheit and around 70% humidity. The eggs will hatch within 35-40 or so days.
Once the eggs hatch, the young should be put into their own separate enclosure (separate from the adults), and the enclosure's temps and humidity levels should match that of the adult anoles. Hatchlings can be fed soft-shelled pinhead crickets, small leaf-hoppers, flightless fruit-flies, and other pesticide-free insects that do not exhibit a hard exoskeleton. The same goes true for adults as well. Pesticide-free insects are a must for anoles, so don't go for bugs in the area if you know that pesticides are sprayed or if you live in a rural area with lots of car exhaust and air pollution that can get on the insect.
 

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Personally I'd go for 6-8 weeks; they're never going to get large enough as babies to be more "robust" (which is a reason for keeping e.g. Rankins back longer), so it would be more a case of getting them feeding and growing reliably, as well as giving them enough time for any problems to show up. With most lizards, once they've made it to 2 months, you can generally assume that there's nothing inherently wrong with them that may make them suddenly drop dead etc...
 
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