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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I've been told my furry male has these on his laterals which I'd always called portholes before. But I can't find any relevant info on these on google. Have been told portholes should be lower and rounder so...



Can something explain the differences to me please about stevedore spots, portholes and white dalmatian spots?
 

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Portholes are white circle-like formations on the laterals (think of a ships portholes), as for stevedore spots never heard of them.
 

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Portholes are white circle-like formations on the laterals (think of a ships portholes), as for stevedore spots never heard of them.
Same, never heard of stevedore : victory:, its always been ports unless things are getting renamed again, in which case i'll still call them ports :Na_Na_Na_Na:

(your image isn't working for me btw :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks

thank you

Not sure why the image isn't working - can't see another method of including one either.

I must admit I cannot find anyone else who's ever heard of such things and considering the source (a very reknowned UK breeder) that surprises me.

Regarding portholes however - and I realise this may be a matter of opinion - but I have seen them described as the round circles but also as these being the best examples however white / cream elongated lateral scales (identical to the enlarged scales that form the pinstripe or quadtsripes) in clusters on the laterals are also portholes. This is why I have described my gecko as having portholes as he has clusters and single such elongated scales - in groups of 3 or more - just above the midline of his laterals. He is a highly furred gecko. The clusters are not as large as some examples I have seen but are definitely still round clusters. So I have decided to ignore the complainer as he decided not to provide any evidence of the existence of his "stevedore spots" and continue with my original description.

Thanks again.
 
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