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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just trying to find some new stuff to gut load my cricks with and have some can can (no idea what this is I might even be typing it wrong), red butterhead multileaf, red multileaf, and lambs lettuce in the fridge, was wondering if any of these are a no-no? Also have the usual stuff like carrots, etc.
 

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Sorry, no idea what can can is, so cant help you there. The other stuff isnt bad per say, just not really going to do much more than hydrate your crickets. With gut load you are trying to correct the nutritional deficiencies of the insect, namely their poor Ca:p content, and the lack of Vit A and E. There are some other ones, but those are the glaring ones. So you want to try to use foods that are high in calcium, low in phosphorous, and high in Vit A and E. Hydrating them is better than nothing though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, no idea what can can is, so cant help you there. The other stuff isnt bad per say, just not really going to do much more than hydrate your crickets. With gut load you are trying to correct the nutritional deficiencies of the insect, namely their poor Ca:p content, and the lack of Vit A and E. There are some other ones, but those are the glaring ones. So you want to try to use foods that are high in calcium, low in phosphorous, and high in Vit A and E. Hydrating them is better than nothing though.
Cheers! Any suggestions then?
 

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Yep, generally speaking anything you would feed a herbivorous reptile is good for gut loading. I usually use winter squash (spaghetti squash is amazing, acorn or butternut squash is good too), orange, carrot, pumpkin, kale, arugula (rocket) etc. and then a good dry mix on the side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yep, generally speaking anything you would feed a herbivorous reptile is good for gut loading. I usually use winter squash (spaghetti squash is amazing, acorn or butternut squash is good too), orange, carrot, pumpkin, kale, arugula (rocket) etc. and then a good dry mix on the side.
Nice, thanks! What would you suggest for drys?
 

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i feed mine fish flakes and bug gel, no stink from veg going off, no mould growing, always dry i use bran as a substrate for them and keep them in small fish tanks from wilko's (wilkinsons)
 

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some good advice so far but due to new thinking I would stick away from the old fishfood method which is one that I used to use. It seems that there is a lot of chemicals and medications going into these foods and we simply don't know the interactions as yet. It always went off far too quick for me,

This is a topic that I have covered in great detail for my new book which is about 2 weeks away. I did a lot of research and found some quite eye opening things. Firstly stay away from bran based gutloaders, this is full of Phytic acid which is not only a Ca inhibitor but is also a chelates it back out of the bones.

For me a gutloading formula based on Alfalfa which you can buy dried and re-hydrate or as fresh is far superior. this can be mixed in with the old fav of carrot and other safe to feed fruits.

so far....my fav off the peg formula is by "cricket crack" which Chameleoco is bringing over at present

john,
 
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Ya, as John said, stay away from the fish food. Not only what he mentioned but also because its high in phosphorous. Youre sort of working against yourself in trying to improve the Ca:p ratio by using it.

As for the dry mix, if you dont want to make your own, a decent alternative is a good quality organic chicken feed. The one made for layers has a good calcium ratio. For myself, I use alfalfa, soy, corn and wheat flour, sometimes oats, and then add a vitamin supplement. Most of the phytic acid John is talking about is in the bran, so milled flours have reduced levels of it. Adding vitamin C to the mix also further reduces the binding effects of phytic acid. Its biggest problem is iron binding though, so make sure you have those squash and dark greens present too.
 
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i have used fish food for over 6 years never had any problems and my reptile are checked once a year some times twice by a specialist vet and they are healthy never had any problems ,
 

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I met a massive fish food producer at the biggest trade pet show in euorpe "Interzoo" who openly told me that 80% of the ingredients of his production (for major brands) was made from dried wild collected fish offal and chicken feathers!

They then add colours and colour enhancing chemicals and all sorts of synthetic compounds to help keep fish alive in less than wild water parameters.

So we just do not know what the long term and parent to young transfer costs are.

There is a new organic range Of fish foods out now called " Al la carte" from Aquarium systems which I understand uses organic, human grade algeas from France.

I am looking at it in detail but this may be a useful addition to a formula like or similar to the one already mentioned.

It's the hidden chemicals that we have to concern ourselves about

John
 

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i have used fish food for over 6 years never had any problems and my reptile are checked once a year some times twice by a specialist vet and they are healthy never had any problems ,
I met a guy who kept his monitor in a 40 gallon fish tank with a single incandescent light bulb for years as well. It didnt make it the best option, nor one that I would recommend to others.

Youve been given good reasons why there are much better, more nutritious and even cheaper items to feed (not that the last one should be the determiner). If you chose not to use them, I suppose the question I have is why? What do you feel is so good about fish food that would make you so against switching it out for a more natural healthy option given what you now know about it? No one is saying your reptiles are going to drop dead if you gut load with fish food, but given that there are so many more healthy things to feed, why bother?
 
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