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I had some problems with my incubator and i was really planning on a new sunglow and an albino patternless project. But it took so long for me to get another incubator, that it's already july, and i want to know what do you think about breeding starting in august-September? I've heard of clutches starting in October. But will there be any problem with off season laying? Will the babies have any problems?
 

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I've never bred leopard geckos, so I don't know all the factors. However, I'd try breeding off season if the parents are fully adult and healthy. Off season animals in captivity do not have to cope with food finding and unfriendly weather the way they would in the wild. On the other hand, you may have to pay more attention to providing the stimuli that cue the adults that it is breeding season. And bad weather may interfere with putting unwanted youngsters on the market. Good luck.
 

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I had some problems with my incubator and i was really planning on a new sunglow and an albino patternless project. But it took so long for me to get another incubator, that it's already july, and i want to know what do you think about breeding starting in august-September? I've heard of clutches starting in October. But will there be any problem with off season laying? Will the babies have any problems?
September is still breeding season, if they breed they breed.
Doesn't affect anything, although you would probably get more clutches in the actual breeding season-feb-sept
 

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Essentially 'breeding season' is environmentally triggered. This means that animals will tend to breed when the weather conditions provide optimal temperatures (which has a trickle down effect on most other factors). In captivity, the same factors are much less pronounced. Effectively leading to a breeding season which lasts for 12 months.

With this in mind, there is no problem with introducing your male to the females now, if the temperature stays roughly constant, they will begin, and continue to breed as normal.

However, for the long term health of the females, I would recommend giving them a break between this 'season' and the next 'season' (regardless of the dates of these).

Andy
 

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Providing you simulate the warmer months then leos can be bred all year round. With no problems.

However when i say all year round i am not saying "pair them now, and keep pairing them right the way throughout the year", they must still have an "off season break", of atleast 4 months from the date of last laying the egg.
I prefer 6 months or wait until they are atleast up to their weight before breeding.
 

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sam, iv been meaning to ask you for a while now, but is that one of your carrot tail leos in your banner, if so that is amazing. sorry ino its way off topic :lol2:

edit

just looked on your site and my face looked something like this :O lol the tangerine tornado and sunglows are awsome !!
 
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