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Discussion Starter #1
Me and my freind have seen some threads on here about finding snakes, i know it's pretty rare to find this but it would be pretty cool to find my own snake and bring it up, what sort of habitats do these snakes live in? im more focused on grass snakes as escaped corns etc.. are hard to find but where would they live? also, should i be causus (can't spell it) about venemous snakes?
 

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Are you threads for real?
 

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wouldnt advise it as grass snakes are in danger.. believe they are protected and i think adders could be also.. but more to the point theyre about the only wild reps we have.. let them stay wild.. :whistling2:
 

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i thought u arent allowed to take animals out the wild, correct me if wrong
 

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To be honest, going looking for a wild snake is pretty stupid in my mind. 1: its wild caught, im sure you know the downsides to keeping wildcaught. 2: Be very carefull as it could cost you £££££ if you take a protected species out of the wild such as the slow worm. Also its much better just to go to the shop and buy a captive bred one.

Although i would love someone to secretly catch a male and a female british grass snake (Natrix natrix) and make a long string of captive breds :)
 

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wild snakes belong in the wild - they are best left alone. If you caught one it would probably refuse to feed and die

If you want a snake buy a captive bred corn
 

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I suggest you get a plane to Indian, catch a wild cobra, smuggle it back into this country and live happily ever after....I've heard these tame down really well with regular handling.
 

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thre are laws against capturing wild snakes in the UK and well as dangers-i.e adders, have a look on the life in cold blood website for good descriptions of each snake and it also tells you the laws about the disturbance/capture/etc of these snakes
 

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Protected British Reptiles:

Snakes:

Adder (Vipera Berus); Protected under the wildlife and country act 1981. Its also Britains ONLY native reptile species that is venomous.

Grass Snake (Natrix Natrix); Protected under the wildlife and country act 1981. Its the most common found snake in britain.

Lizards:

Slow Worm (Anguis Fragillis); Protected under the wildlife and country act 1981. It one of the least common lizards found and becoming very rare!

Common Lizard (Lacerta Vivapara); Not Protected. These are very widespread across britain but still try not to catch them.

Wall Lizard (Podarcis Murallis); Protected even though they are a invasive species. Isnt a native species introduced from europe.

Sand Lizards (Lacerta Agillis); Protected under the wildlife and country act 1981. Massivly endangered species.

Green Lizard (Lacerta Billiana); Protected in Britain. Not native and very rare only seen occasionally.

Terrapins:

Red-Eared (Trachemys Scripta Elegans); Not Protected In Britain. Not native species and has became increasingly popular since the movie of ninja turtles but then the pets was released into the wild. Can be found on banks ect. Also been told that you are suppose to remove them from the wild as they are causing big changes in the enviroment!

Hope It helped i just typed it up, i think i got all the latin names right :)
 

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Youngy, wild-caught British snakes don't make very good pets.

1. Smooth snakes are very rare and disturbing one is against the law - you are not allowed to catch or keep these at all.
2. Adders are venomous and could put you in the hospital. To keep one you would need a dangerous wild animals license that included adders specifically and I am pretty sure you have to be 18 to apply for one.
3. Grass snakes are the best bet if you really wanted to try as you do not need any licence to catch and keep one as long as you have the land owner's permission to take it off their property... BUT they are difficult to convert from eating live frogs to defrost rodents. They have a particularly powerful garlicky musk if they're startled. They also need a very different enclosure to a corn or royal - you may find it's difficult to keep them cool enough indoors. In order to make a proper job of it I'd suggest you spend a few years studying how they live in the wild, understanding why they do what they do on a daily basis and THEN consider obtaining a captive bred specimen from Europe before trying with a wildcaught.
 

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Lol this is going to turn into a debate. Untill i am properly prooven im not changing my mind :p Sorry but i think there snakes ....
Ok, here's six reasons why a slow worm is not a snake:

1. Snakes never have eyelids - they have clear scales over the eye like contact lenses. Slow worms have eyelids and can blink and close their eyes like most other lizards. (Side fact: The only lizards without eyelids have legs)
2. Snakes have two-piece lower jaws. Slow worms, like other lizards, have a single U-shaped lower jawbone.
3. Snakes do not have any external ear structures. Slow worms have a slight dimple.
4. Snakes cannot voluntarily drop their tails. Slow worms can.
5. Snakes are mostly body, with a short tail. Slow worms have tails as long as their bodies (if they've got their whole tail). This is why slow worms are pretty stiff in their movement - they don't move like snakes.
6. Snakes have wide, flat ventral scales that they use to move. Slow worms have uniformly-sized scales over their entire bodies.
 

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Ok, here's six reasons why a slow worm is not a snake:

1. Snakes never have eyelids - they have clear scales over the eye like contact lenses. Slow worms have eyelids and can blink and close their eyes like most other lizards. (Side fact: The only lizards without eyelids have legs)
2. Snakes have two-piece lower jaws. Slow worms, like other lizards, have a single U-shaped lower jawbone.
3. Snakes do not have any external ear structures. Slow worms have a slight dimple.
4. Snakes cannot voluntarily drop their tails. Slow worms can.
5. Snakes are mostly body, with a short tail. Slow worms have tails as long as their bodies (if they've got their whole tail). This is why slow worms are pretty stiff in their movement - they don't move like snakes.
6. Snakes have wide, flat ventral scales that they use to move. Slow worms have uniformly-sized scales over their entire bodies.
Ok i changed my mind, I told you a slowworm was a Lizard :whip:

Edit: Now i do feel stupid, i even thought it was a snake even looking at its latin name o_O
 

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A Re-print of one of my earlier posts...

I know, I'm lazy but it's rather a sizeable post...

Myself, I am sort of ambivalent on this one.

I can exactly see why most would be opposed to collecting and keeping wild reptiles when there are so many cb species more suited to the terrarium sold in the hobby that don't put pressure on wild populations. These snakes are more likely to adapt and thrive in captive conditions, are generally better all-round pets and won't go through the stress of settling in (indeed, if the wc EVER settles in).

Having said that, I would be lying if I said I had never collected a herp and kept it in my younger days. In fact, it was growing up in Gibralter, Spain and southern France, chasing wall lizards, moorish geckos, viperine snakes and horseshoe whip snakes (amongst others) that I think I first developed a love for these animals.

I still hunt for reptiles when I am abroad or in the countryside here (there's something thrilling about seeing even a little adder or common lizard for the umpteenth time, its a feeling I don't think will ever fade) only I don't remove wild animals from the environment. Frankly I no longer see the need for it - I prefer to just watch them when I can.

Nowadays most hobbyists start with a cb corn snake or royal python that is already feeding, relatively stress-free and have at their disposal all the technological wonders currently available to keep their chosen reptile happy and in great condition. And that is a GOOD thing.

However, back home where I grew up in Gibraltar these things were just not available at the time (today there are limited amounts of heat pads and fluorescents occasionally in stock there, and not much else). I (and I'm sure a good many keepers who started with a reptile they caught themself) made do with old fish tanks and light bulbs.
Despite this, I successfully maintained for many years all sorts of little lizards and not-so-little snakes - Podarcis, Psammodromus, Tarentola etc. My first snakes were a Horseshoe Whip Snake, a couple of Viperine snakes and a juvenile Montpellier snake (DWA over here, but I still consider it amongst my favourite ever!). I also used to find Southern Smooth snakes, Ladder snakes, Spanish Grass snakes (Natrix natrix astreptophora) and Lataste's vipers, though far less frequently.

When I moved to the UK in my middling teens I managed to find and keep common lizards, slow worms and grass snakes, and even bred the latter two species with little effort.

HOWEVER I must be honest and say that this is all well and good, but nowadays there is no need for it. As I said, with so many interesting and/or easier to keep species on the market, there's little point in keeping a British reptile you might find just for the sake of it - unless it is a species you yourself have a particular interest in and really have to maintain just one or two specimens.

The key thing here is being RESPONSIBLE. I personally do not find fault if somebody collects one or two of a COMMON species (i.e not threatened on a national or, just as importantly, local scale) and tries it in the terrarium for interest's sake. This is how the hobby began, after all, back when there were no cb royals or corns or beardies sold in pet shops.

Having said this I feel I should also point out that common lizards do not do well indoors. Of the legally keepable British reptiles only the Slow worm is really suitable as a pet and does well on worms and slugs.

Grass snakes CAN be kept as well, but as already mentioned several times on this topic, feeding may be a problem. Most will readily accept live amphibians but the feeding of native amphibians (or reptiles) to a pet snake is something I will never excuse. Some of the specimens I've had have adapted to fish or mice (yes, mice!), the rest have been released.

On that note, perhaps larger female grass snakes would make better captives than the smaller males. I've had two large females: one I caught when I was young and wide-eyed and bred for me with a tiny male. The other I found a couple of years back mauled by a cat or dog which I took in and fattened up. Both adapted to fuzzy mice rather quickly (although they only ate when left well alone for the night). I also found that the smaller snakes were more likely to take fish than the larger ones.

I feel happy to say that the injured animal improved dramatically and was released at the end of that summer. Although I agree that the re-release of animals into the wild is NOT a good idea, especially captive-bred ones (even/especially if they are a native species), this was an already adult animal taken in only for a season and I like to think that I saved it's life.

:up:

Okay, many will still disagree with me and say that keeping ANY wc reptile (British or otherwise) is wrong. I accept this opinion too. As I say, there's not really a need for it. BUT does this still apply to the hobby as a whole? How many tropical snakes are imported each year to the UK that are wc? I can think of dozens of species that people drool over on these very forums - Boigas, some boas and pythons, as well as many rearfangs, spring to mind.

The truth is that we are only just beginning to understand the needs of some rarer species that previously were thought difficult to keep. There are no CB populations of many of these wonderful species and it is only with the introduction of fresh bloodlines that this is likely to change. Many of my animals arrived as WC. I think that there is a responsibility in the captive care of such species to make the attempt to breed them and release some cb animals into the hobby, hopefully in the long term lessening the pressure on wild populations.

When I decide to acquire one of these wc animals, whenever possible I will get not just one or a pair, but as many as possible. Some of these rare animals may be difficult to find again (Thrasops, Dendrelaphis, Philothamnus, etc). With these I try and form breeding groups that hopefully will produce offspring to be inroduced to the hobby. My personal ambition is to get a hold of every Thrasops jacksoni I can and start a small-scale breeding group that regularly produce young. That's still for the future though.

I know this is slightly off-topic, and I am still in no way recomending the collection of native herps. BUT I think it is food for thought.

BTW if you do manage to catch anything you intend to keep, feel free to PM if you want to share any information. Again (and I cannot say this is enough) I do not think it is necessary but I have had my own experiences with some of these species that might help you. If you are going to keep any (which I can kind of understand) then if anyone has any advice we may as well share it to contribute to their well-being.

Finally, it IS legal to collect and keep slow worms, common lizards and grass snakes. It is illegal to kill them or sell them, but you are allowed to keep them as pets.
 

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Ok i changed my mind, I told you a slowworm was a Lizard :whip:

Edit: Now i do feel stupid, i even thought it was a snake even looking at its latin name o_O
Anguis actually means "worm" if I remember rightly :) Anguis fragilis = "fragile worm". They're lovely little lizards, though - ours eat slugs and waxworms.

And incidentally:

Podarcis muralis (Common wall lizards) are protected in the UK even though they are non-native - catch one at your peril from the EPS legislation.
Same goes for Lacerta (Zootoca) vivipara, the Common lizard and Lacerta viridis, the Green Lizard.

On the other hand, Red-eared Sliders are an invasive species and SHOULD be removed from the wild - they are doing damage to the ecosystem.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Wow, sorry for all the trouble, i feel like an idiot now.. thanks telling me anyway, ill make sure if i see a snake, i will leave it.
 
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