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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I understand that this may be slated as the dumbest question ever...but I was wondering if it meant the same for snakes as it does for humans when he yawns?
I don't know if he is yawning or if it means something else, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't ignoring anything important.

He is a 2 month old Royal, lasr ate on the 31st so was going to feed him tomorrow or the day after, and he seems to be settling in to his new home well, and seems to sleep a lot (which I think is normal...lazy bugger lol) but just wanted to make sure I wasn't misinterperating this behaviour.

Thanks for your help everyone :2thumb:
 

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not so sure about yawning in general but with my 2 snakes it looks like they are yawning after they have fed and that is to re-locate their jaws. :2thumb:
 

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No he is not yawning because he is tired, if that was the question?

He is possibly due to shed, and the 'yawn' stretches the skin a little prior to shedding. Or he could be just straightening his jaw up. Either way, it's nothing to worry about, as long as it's just a quick yawn, and he doesn't sit with his mouth gaping, all is perfectly normal snake behaviour.
 
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It's an interesting subject, because no one knows 100% why humans yawn. Many doctors claim it's because we are tired and thus we increase the oxygen intake by yawning, but it's been proven in studies that a human in a high oxygen environment - will still yawn. Also, why people tend to yawn in response to others yawning, no doctors have yet proven.

In a lot of animals, yawning can be a threat-gesture, showing the teeth, but in a passive way - not actually saying I'm going to attack just saying "oh look how big my teeth are", but this doesn't really apply to snakes - mostly monkeys I think.

The most likely theory that applies to everyone is that yawning is purely the desire to stretch muscles and increase lung capacity / lung tissue - and this is the one that's likely to apply the most to snakes. Many snakes will yawn after eating - because eating has stretched/displaced the jaw, so yawning will reposition.

It's fairly normal in snakes, as long as he's not doing it constantly and as long as there is no wheezing, blowing bubbles etc. that might indicate a respiratory problem he's trying to clear.

No one really knows though, in humans, or any animals, exactly why at a given time a yawn is triggered, it's interesting to wonder why though :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone that has really put my mind at ease...I think he may be due to shed soon so that may be it as he is looking less vivid and a bit washed out, and last shed about 5 weeks ago so for a 2 month old may be due one? And has been rubbing against the side of the viv a bit too?

Don't think it's the repositioning of the jaw as the hasn't eaten for 4 days so his jaw shouldn't be in the wrong place lol...

But thanks again you're comments have helped...don't want anything being wrong with my new best little mate lol
 

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I did some work on this at uni while studying evolution a while back.
The theory is, that animals including prehistoric humans would be out on the hunt or need to stay awake to avoid predators.
The yawn is a response to the body attempting to re jolt it self and keep the animal awake. It does this by expanding the lungs and stretching the head muscles thus causing blood to rush to both the head and lungs for activity as well as larger surface area for oxygen exchange.
It has become well known that the reason why yawns seem to "catch" is to help awaken, make the animals more alert and more "on the ball", and to also help its pack, herd, hunting team by making them yawn. The brain of one animal will see its pack mate yawn and the animal it self will be also feel the need to yawn.
Before long the whole pack had yawned and are far more alert than they were prior to the first yawn.

People say snakes are relocating their jaws after dislocating them, this is simply not true. Snake do not dislocate their jaws in anyway but do actually have a bottom jaw that does on join in the middle (the chin) therefore allows the whole bottom jaw to stretch to skin capacity.
The relocation that does happen is when the mouth may be closed or rubbed out of position slightly and the teeth being the way they are make it impossible just the slide the jaw to close the mouth properly thus needing the yawn to correct the problem. Sometimes, no doubt it may just feel nice to do so for them, or if they feel their teeth may be irritating a certain point in the gums like they can do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I did some work on this at uni while studying evolution a while back.
The theory is, that animals including prehistoric humans would be out on the hunt or need to stay awake to avoid predators.
The yawn is a response to the body attempting to re jolt it self and keep the animal awake. It does this by expanding the lungs and stretching the head muscles thus causing blood to rush to both the head and lungs for activity as well as larger surface area for oxygen exchange.
It has become well known that the reason why yawns seem to "catch" is to help awaken, make the animals more alert and more "on the ball", and to also help its pack, herd, hunting team by making them yawn. The brain of one animal will see its pack mate yawn and the animal it self will be also feel the need to yawn.
Before long the whole pack had yawned and are far more alert than they were prior to the first yawn.

People say snakes are relocating their jaws after dislocating them, this is simply not true. Snake do not dislocate their jaws in anyway but do actually have a bottom jaw that does on join in the middle (the chin) therefore allows the whole bottom jaw to stretch to skin capacity.
The relocation that does happen is when the mouth may be closed or rubbed out of position slightly and the teeth being the way they are make it impossible just the slide the jaw to close the mouth properly thus needing the yawn to correct the problem. Sometimes, no doubt it may just feel nice to do so for them, or if they feel their teeth may be irritating a certain point in the gums like they can do.
Extremely informative and interesting to read...and so the long and short of it is still that its purely natural and nothing to worry about?

PHEW!

:2thumb:
 

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I did some work on this at uni while studying evolution a while back.
The theory is, that animals including prehistoric humans would be out on the hunt or need to stay awake to avoid predators.
The yawn is a response to the body attempting to re jolt it self and keep the animal awake. It does this by expanding the lungs and stretching the head muscles thus causing blood to rush to both the head and lungs for activity as well as larger surface area for oxygen exchange.
It has become well known that the reason why yawns seem to "catch" is to help awaken, make the animals more alert and more "on the ball", and to also help its pack, herd, hunting team by making them yawn. The brain of one animal will see its pack mate yawn and the animal it self will be also feel the need to yawn.
Before long the whole pack had yawned and are far more alert than they were prior to the first yawn.

People say snakes are relocating their jaws after dislocating them, this is simply not true. Snake do not dislocate their jaws in anyway but do actually have a bottom jaw that does on join in the middle (the chin) therefore allows the whole bottom jaw to stretch to skin capacity.
The relocation that does happen is when the mouth may be closed or rubbed out of position slightly and the teeth being the way they are make it impossible just the slide the jaw to close the mouth properly thus needing the yawn to correct the problem. Sometimes, no doubt it may just feel nice to do so for them, or if they feel their teeth may be irritating a certain point in the gums like they can do.
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