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Discussion Starter #1

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Obviously not.
Sounds more like a "everything will be alright on the night" kind of attitude. Just wait for the news of gangs of marauding pacmans laying waste to the phibs the cane toads haven't eaten already lol
 

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Intending being the operative word lol
 

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Haha - i did misread it Ron/Mike (or rather miss a couple of references), near the top it does say the importation was purely for zoo's! However, they did say that release into the countryside was 'not intended'. Surely they mean - 'of course there'll all be kept in secure indoor vivaria' ???!

6. Assess the consequences of the species becoming established in the Australian environment

In the unlikely event that this species became established in Australia the main impact would be on smaller ground-dwelling vertebrates, as they would form prey for the species. Juvenile frogs would eat insects and aquatic invertebrates. The frogs pose no threat to people, buildings, or the environment generally, although it is possible that they may compete with native frogs for food or micro-habitats.

10. Provide an overall assessment on the potential impacts of importing the species, include both the potential impacts of the particular import that is proposed and the potential impacts of the species per se (i.e. the potential impacts on the environment should the specimen(s) ever be released from effective human control)


It is not intended that these frogs ever be released from quarantine control and they would always be maintained in ARAZPA zoos. In the event that they did escape and potentially become established, the likely environmental impact would be low:
  • Unlikely to establish and breed due to distances between holding zoos and suitable habitat.
  • Very small numbers are intended for importation and holding.
  • This and similar species have been held in captivity, both in zoos and private collections, in Europe and the USA for many years with no records of escapes or establishment.
  • The frogs are brightly coloured, which would aid them being seen should they escape.
  • The frogs pose no threat to humans or the general environment, and, given the numbers of frogs involved, a relatively low risk to native Australian fauna.
  • These frogs are very sedentary and do not move great distances in nature.
  • This is not a venomous species.
 

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Interesting....Anyone fancy smuggling a cpl of pairs into Aus... :lol2:
This topic caused me to youtube search for a topic ive never searched for before...and was actually kinda dissapointed that there wasnt a vid...Thats wrong I know but meh!

Bufo power would win anyway :whistling2:
 

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Interesting....Anyone fancy smuggling a cpl of pairs into Aus... :lol2:
This topic caused me to youtube search for a topic ive never searched for before...and was actually kinda dissapointed that there wasnt a vid...Thats wrong I know but meh!

Bufo power would win anyway :whistling2:
Haha- a horned frog would probably eat a cane- but it wouldn't live long enough to regret it!
 
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